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GAF-Hop |OT14| The 6 God is Five Writers, And One False Idol

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ViewtifulJC

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Oct 14, 2010
66,828
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Future - DS2 Review, Bought to you by Desfantano:
A general rule for whether I enjoyed a track from this album is whether or not I perceive the hook to be infectious or not, the beats are consistently on point and dynamic especially in the first half of the album. Future works some magic with some of the hooks on the songs. Songs like I Thought It Was a Drought, Slave Master, Blow a Bag, Where Ya At, Lil One, and even the seemingly repetitive I Serve The Bass contain Future's trademark charisma and spirited yet highly slopped inflection.

The problem with some songs that don't have strong hooks is that Future doesn't really do enough to add anything substantial to the backing music, which at times drowns him out and leaves him sounding monotonous as a result. This is not to say that the repetition or Future's sometimes unaffected tone always is a negative, but sometimes it sounds seem to fit the mood or certain songs more so than others. On I Serve the Bass Future's unadulterated devotion to the "bass" or the beat comes off as brilliant and integrates well the track with Future sounding as a demonic as that fuzzy synth and bass line in the song. However, on a track like Blood on the Money, which sports one of the most expansive and atmospheric beats of the album, Future sounds rather stiff and uninteresting. Stick Talk is a good song mainly because it has a good hook and arguably the most well rounded beat of the album, but even on this track Future's verses are quite forgettable.

And to clear the air, I'm not expecting Future to make any sort of crazy lyrical statement whatsoever, but I feel as though his strengths lie in his ability to convey tone and emotion (or lack of emotion) through the manipulation of his voice. There are quite a few tracks that just don't have the sort of vocal anomalies or twisted inflections I've come to expect from Future. When he's on point you can almost sense the codeine laced soft drinks on his tongue, but when he's not his verses just bore in comparison to big hugeness of everything else. Most of the quotable lines in the album are contained in its choruses in my opinion.

Everyone has a varying favorites in the first ten tracks, but I want to talk about a couple of under appreciated cuts. Slave Master is one of the biggest tracks on the album for me. Future stands above the monstrous thematic beat in both his verses and the chorus. He changes flows and tone at will, adapting his trademark style to the beat perfectly, and comes up with one of the most humorous hooks of the album to me. "Drop Out The Whip, Like I'm a Slave Master," just picture white men singing that shit as they drive around in the hood, and you know they will because that shit is irresistibly infectious. Freak Hoe features one of my favorite beats on the album that sounds reminds me of heyday nasty Cash Money tracks coupled with the demonic atmospheric trap of the modern era. I can just picture B.G. in the background screaming "She Get It From Her Mamma." Future's flow is also really on point on this shit. Pretty much all of the first tracks range from good to great to me.

However, the album is quite front loaded. I want to say that I think he might have been going for the whole drug comedown concept when he orchestrated the album. However, the albums ends with some weaker quality downtempo tracks and two songs that are indeed bangers, but were recycled from past tapes. Colossal is a decent track, but the beat actually sounds a little too familiar and Future's flow is almost on some robotic mumbling shit. Rich Sex is awful. It doesn't sound like it fits the album, ruining the flow and standing almost in direct opposition to the track that follows. Blood on the Money as I've already touched on is a missed opportunity. Strippers and Percocet actually has some good Future verses, I think containing the best personification of a supposed codeine flow, however the chorus is kind of a mixed bag. Real Sisters is a bore despite a pretty hype beat and a seemingly hilarious subject matter. Kno the Meaning is the worst track on the album for me. It has this really somber beat and Future starts off with this really affected dramatic tone, yet his problems are the equivalent of white wine shit that I couldn't give a fuck about and only stand to annoy me after painting himself as this almost nihilistic sex-crazed druggie. He even stops mid verse to mourn the loss a hard drive like he's about to talk about a death in the family or some shit. And the album ends with the undeniable amazing Fuck Up Some Commas, but I've heard that track so many times at this point.

Light 8

P.S. I'm sure the review sounded too negative to warrant such a high score, but I was really disappointed because I feel this could have been one of the best trap albums ever.
for comparison's sake
 

Vorheez

Member
Nov 4, 2013
2,703
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Well, I figured out why I never liked Future and why I suddenly changed my mind. It was all a matter of perspective. I first heard Future years ago on one of Gucci's earlier mix tapes, Trap Back, when he was featured on the track Sometimes. It was bad, even compared to Gucci's verses (go listen to it if you don't believe me), and this became the experience that governed my thinking about Future up until now. As I watched his career grow I noticed him slowly begin to adopt the autotune sound and always thought of it as a copout, and that he was just using it as a tool to mask his inferior ability. It was a gimmick to me. I felt like Future was just some corny ass dude who couldn't make it in the regular trap game so he felt that sticking his head under water and making his verses inaudible would keep him alive in the industry. Still, even with these preconceived notions about him, I gave his releases a fair shot, but nothing would change my mind about him. It was probably that initial exposure to Future that tainted my view of him, but it would stay that way until I heard DS2.

I didn't expect anything when I put DS2 on, I figured it would just be another bland Future release that I would use as background noise while I played Rocket League. Something was different though. Something felt "off" about Future, and it was apparent immediately with the intro track. This was not the Future I thought I knew. I felt like the mixing of lean in the beginning was an interesting touch, but I never expected it to take the turn that it did. Although it sounded like a typical trap song, Future's delivery and lyrics gave the song an entirely different feel. Lines such as "bitch i'ma choose the dirty over you, you know I ain't scared to lose you" and "tell me them lies you want me to hear, I try to forget but it's hard to forgive" felt way more real than they had any business being on a track like this. My interest was piqued. When I Serve the Base came on I knew that the intro track wasn't just a fluke, and I knew this album was going to be something special. The deep, crunching track laid down by Metro Boomin really hits home the theme of this album, and Future's hazy drug induced delivery as his first cup of lean sets in is truly haunting. The line "tryna make a popstar and they made a monster" sent chills down my spine because even through the muddy production and wavy vocals, you can hear the raw conviction in Future's voice. It was at this point that I realized I had to have been wrong about Future, I must have missed something, so after finishing the album and hearing much of the same,I went back and did some brief research about his history and was able to come up with my own conclusion about Future.

We will never know the internal intricacies of his early life, but I guarantee Future has seen things that he wishes never to speak of again. Things that he has been fighting to suppress his entire life but he is losing that fight, and DS2 is a declaration of him surrendering. I picture Future as being someone who just wanted to get out of his situation, like thousands of other artists, but was constantly being held back by his past and subsequent drug abuse to help forget that past. When he got a taste of fame he felt like he might have found his ticket, he felt like he was hopefully able to escape his demons and put his past behind him. We know this never worked out as evident in DS2's material and would explain the inconsistencies on Honest and Pluto. He was trying to be something he wasn't and it showed in the lack of direction in his earlier material, something I frequently took issue with. He would have his love ballads, bangers, and "true" Future tracks all multilayered on an album. I feel like we were actually hearing his internal struggles on those two albums as he was trying to appease Ciara (lol) and the industry, and trying to be the star he thought he wanted to be, but also battling those demons that have haunted him most of his life. I personally feel that DS2 is the sound of a broken man who has succumbed to his demons and Future has taken solitude in his drug abuse because he has given up on trying to be something he isn't.

"I pour 2 zips nigga, I'm feelin' way better"
"A nigga was depressed now my mind back healthy"
"I gave up on my conscience gotta live with it"
"I pour me up some drink, say fuck my problems"
"I know the devil is real, I know the devil is real..."

I never understood why people were comparing it to XXX until now. Both Danny and Future can't be saved, and they have both accepted their fates with DS2/XXX and have decided to convert their sorrows into art. I realize now how wrong I was about Future, and this newfound perspective has entirely changed how I listen to his music. When I went back and listened to DS2 with this altered perspective I was able to sum up the album with two words: tragically beautiful.
 

PhoenixDark

Banned
Sep 25, 2005
68,178
3
0
32
smh just got around to listening to funk flex' response to drake and this dude is dropping bombs on bombs on bombs like a fucking maniac makes me think he hasn't got shit


and how he threw a-rod in the bushes smh lmao
Real talk, Flex is corny as fuck. He's right about Drake but still...dude is once again inserting himself into a story that has nothing to do with him. Every time I listen to him I'm reminded of Nas' diss of him. "Look at his face, man." smh

Dude is always dick riding and apologizing. If Hov went on the show next week you know Flex would be like "yo fam, I messed up by going at you a few months ago. I'm sorry Hov, forgive me!" Corny.
 

Glass Rebel

Member
Oct 12, 2010
31,645
8
675
Real talk, Flex is corny as fuck. He's right about Drake but still...dude is once again inserting himself into a story that has nothing to do with him. Every time I listen to him I'm reminded of Nas' diss of him. "Look at his face, man." smh

Dude is always dick riding and apologizing. If Hov went on the show next week you know Flex would be like "yo fam, I messed up by going at you a few months ago. I'm sorry Hov, forgive me!" Corny.
Yeah, I was trying to figure out how he got his corny ass into this beef but then I remembered it was Flex.

I think Charlamagne is almost as lame but I loved his "What if Funk Flex told the truth video"
 

Koozek

Member
May 19, 2013
11,501
1
0
Vorheez, whew. Gonna listen to DS2 again tomorrow with other ears. I still like the beats more than the vocals, but maybe I have to give it a few more spins.
 

Tokubetsu

Member
Mar 1, 2005
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1,410
31
Deep Underwater
soundcloud.com
Well, I figured out why I never liked Future and why I suddenly changed my mind. It was all a matter of perspective. I first heard Future years ago on one of Gucci's earlier mix tapes, Trap Back, when he was featured on the track Sometimes. It was bad, even compared to Gucci's verses (go listen to it if you don't believe me), and this became the experience that governed my thinking about Future up until now. As I watched his career grow I noticed him slowly begin to adopt the autotune sound and always thought of it as a copout, and that he was just using it as a tool to mask his inferior ability. It was a gimmick to me. I felt like Future was just some corny ass dude who couldn't make it in the regular trap game so he felt that sticking his head under water and making his verses inaudible would keep him alive in the industry. Still, even with these preconceived notions about him, I gave his releases a fair shot, but nothing would change my mind about him. It was probably that initial exposure to Future that tainted my view of him, but it would stay that way until I heard DS2.

I didn't expect anything when I put DS2 on, I figured it would just be another bland Future release that I would use as background noise while I played Rocket League. Something was different though. Something felt "off" about Future, and it was apparent immediately with the intro track. This was not the Future I thought I knew. I felt like the mixing of lean in the beginning was an interesting touch, but I never expected it to take the turn that it did. Although it sounded like a typical trap song, Future's delivery and lyrics gave the song an entirely different feel. Lines such as "bitch i'ma choose the dirty over you, you know I ain't scared to lose you" and "tell me them lies you want me to hear, I try to forget but it's hard to forgive" felt way more real than they had any business being on a track like this. My interest was piqued. When I Serve the Base came on I knew that the intro track wasn't just a fluke, and I knew this album was going to be something special. The deep, crunching track laid down by Metro Boomin really hits home the theme of this album, and Future's hazy drug induced delivery as his first cup of lean sets in is truly haunting. The line "tryna make a popstar and they made a monster" sent chills down my spine because even through the muddy production and wavy vocals, you can hear the raw conviction in Future's voice. It was at this point that I realized I had to have been wrong about Future, I must have missed something, so after finishing the album and hearing much of the same,I went back and did some brief research about his history and was able to come up with my own conclusion about Future.

We will never know the internal intricacies of his early life, but I guarantee Future has seen things that he wishes never to speak of again. Things that he has been fighting to suppress his entire life but he is losing that fight, and DS2 is a declaration of him surrendering. I picture Future as being someone who just wanted to get out of his situation, like thousands of other artists, but was constantly being held back by his past and subsequent drug abuse to help forget that past. When he got a taste of fame he felt like he might have found his ticket, he felt like he was hopefully able to escape his demons and put his past behind him. We know this never worked out as evident in DS2's material and would explain the inconsistencies on Honest and Pluto. He was trying to be something he wasn't and it showed in the lack of direction in his earlier material, something I frequently took issue with. He would have his love ballads, bangers, and "true" Future tracks all multilayered on an album. I feel like we were actually hearing his internal struggles on those two albums as he was trying to appease Ciara (lol) and the industry, and trying to be the star he thought he wanted to be, but also battling those demons that have haunted him most of his life. I personally feel that DS2 is the sound of a broken man who has succumbed to his demons and Future has taken solitude in his drug abuse because he has given up on trying to be something he isn't.

"I pour 2 zips nigga, I'm feelin' way better"
"A nigga was depressed now my mind back healthy"
"I gave up on my conscience gotta live with it"
"I pour me up some drink, say fuck my problems"
"I know the devil is real, I know the devil is real..."

I never understood why people were comparing it to XXX until now. Both Danny and Future can't be saved, and they have both accepted their fates with DS2/XXX and have decided to convert their sorrows into art. I realize now how wrong I was about Future, and this newfound perspective has entirely changed how I listen to his music. When I went back and listened to DS2 with this altered perspective I was able to sum up the album with two words: tragically beautiful.
"No matter what we grow into we never gon' escape our past."
- Vince Staples, 2015.
 

Vorheez

Member
Nov 4, 2013
2,703
1
0
Vorheez, that's actually a pretty dope writeup and I agree with it entirely.
Vorheez:


Me:


*reads*

Me:
Damn, good stuff Vorheez. Agree with a lot of it.
Vorheez, whew. Gonna listen to DS2 again tomorrow with other ears. I still like the beats more than the vocals, but maybe I have to give it a few more spins.
Thanks brehs

Wait, are you guys saying I'm Des?
 

Storm Chamber

Banned
Apr 5, 2013
6,098
0
0
Underground
I'll Sleep When You Are Dead was El-P's best work imo. Dude was on another level with those beats.


I liked this album but I still prefer the industrial noise that was Fantastic Damage better.

Both better than C4C which I just cannot get into for some reason



El-P is at his best when he's on his weirdo kick or whatever y'all want to call it. I'll take I'll Sleep When I'm Dead, Fantastic Damage, and Cancer 4 Cure over the majority of Mikes mostly uninspired solo work.
Rap music is one of the most overated rap albums in the last 5 years

Like two good tracks.
These posts are AIDS in opinion form. Jesus
 

HiResDes

Member
Dec 1, 2007
34,289
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0
Very well written Vorheez, but you and everyone that has brought up XXX in reference to DS2 are completely off base in my humble opinion. I definitely like DS2, but I don't get the same sense of depth and of strong narrative that others seem to be pulling from it. And while Future does have a few truly emotive moments it seems to me as if people are supplanting this notion of melodrama and lucid storytelling into an album in which is the emcee is often the least profound element. The atmosphere, the darkness, and the tone are highly contingent on the highly spirited backing music. Future brings very little real insight to the table.

Future's concession to drugs and the trap lifestyle lie pretty much in line with what has become the expected, standard model in the genre. He doesn't say anything outside of what could be considered a trap trope at this point, and if you had told me that Alley Boy or Yo Gotti had rapped the same shit I wouldn't have bat an eye. When Future finally decides to dedicate a full track to airing out his problems and divulging the root "meaning' we find out that he actually has less to bitch about than Drake or even Curtis Jackson at this point. Never at any point in the album does Future seem truly self aware, lucid, poetic, or sardonic as Danny. And if Dirty Sprite 2 has a tailored drug comedown it's messy, inconsistent, and ineffective. Rich $ex, Colossal, and Blood on the Money (even if we ignore the horrid bonus tracks) are just more of the shit same we heard throughout rapped at a different tempo without any progression. Nothing has changed since the beginning and Future only seems to stagnate in his vocal delivery, making his seemingly estranged psyche seem like a much less urgent problem.

XXX is a masterpiece and an album that should no point in time be compared to a collection of trap tropes. It has all of the dramatic excess of DS2 coupled with highly poetic moments of reflection, self-loathing humor, and the depiction of a truly moribund state of life from an insider unafraid to shed the layers of his psuedo bravado in favor of airing his true vulnerabilities. Every line Danny utters tells a story and adds color, while Future's range of topics and portrayal of "rock bottom" lies in monochrome. Sure you can pick out these little block quotes where Future shows glimpses of color, but if I were to block quote the deep moments of say Danny's opener "XXX" I'd pretty much have to quote the whole thing:


The masta of the ace sitting on chrome
Dark nights tryna sleep stomach on fire
Delusional from hunger so I couldn't get tired
Imaging the equalizer goin from green to red
Words that rhyme together just appear all in my head
Sorta like Neo with them Matrix codes
I try to escape it hoping drugs a numb a soul
Say I'm getting old and times running out
Repeating instrumentals tryna figure patterns out
I never leave the house ain't slept in three days
Popping pills, writing, drinking and smoking haze
Weaving the kicks and snares dodging hooks
Tryna keep it original something that's overlooked
Way a nigga goin might go out like Sam Cooke
Or locked up calling home for money on my books
Cause if this shit don't work nigga I failed at life
Turning to these drugs now these drugs turned my life
It's the downward spiral, Got me suicidal
But too scared to do it so these pills a be the rival
Surpassing all my idols
Took the wrong turn
But can't go back now so now let that blunt burn
Cause now it's my turn if I fuck it all up
Took a while to get here now I depend on these drugs
I took a while to get here now I depend on these drugs


Every line contains a metaphor, something that adds to the character development, or is a reference to past tragic heroes defeated by an onslaught of drug abuse. When Future talks about the past it's only to enhance this macho image he's made for himself of the stupefied nihilist who has traded love for the excesses of life and trap money. When Danny talks about his past we a greater glimpse into his psyche and we get songs like "Party All the Time", which is basically Danny's sardonic take on "Brenda's Got a Baby", and "DNA" which features a profound outlook on social conditioning and how genetic predispositions to drug use from a vicious cycle. Even comical tracks like "Scrap or Die" only help embolden the bleakness and urgency of his situation and represent a true life or death struggle. There's a real possibility of death that is immediately felt throughout XXX that seems rather skimped upon in DS2.

If you think Danny is willingly partaking in these nefarious activities and abusing Adderall then you haven't grasped the album's concept whatsoever. The hopelessness and despair contained in XXX paints the narcotic escape of the subject in a much less successful and glum light. Furthermore, Danny's verses are more much imaginative and form a greater degree of the the picture than of the gibberish that sloshes out of Future's mouth. Danny adds the color, the tone, and forms the subject entirely on his own. He's able to comment on what the past, present, and future may hold with greater sincerity. And XXX would be just as effective if it were rapped entirely in acapella; whereas Future's contribution to Dirty Sprite 2 would just make up the grassy knoll in the background. The lyrical disparity between the two is a gulf Magellan himself wouldn't attempt to cross.
 

RP912

Banned
Mar 28, 2014
15,301
1
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I liked this album but I still prefer the industrial noise that was Fantastic Damage better.

Both better than C4C which I just cannot get into for some reason







These posts are AIDS in opinion form. Jesus


Fantastic Damage was good, but I'll Sleep When You Dead was out of this world. You can play that shit in the year 3000 and it would be up to date. Honestly, FD sounds a bit dated at certain parts of the album, plus it got that lame Ill Bill on it :/.
 

richardhawk

Member
Oct 14, 2011
2,755
0
0
be a grown ass man hyped about pokemon music brehs.


I actually don't know if thats pokemon music but it's still wack
 

ARK322

Neo Member
Jan 16, 2013
157
0
0
Nor Cal
I see a parallel between DS2 and XXX, but it's very superficial. Maybe a more accurate comparison is between DS2 and Live.Love.A$AP. Both capture a feeling of constant inebriation, but unlike XXX, neither explore the consequences and implications of that type of lifestyle in a very substantive way.

EDIT: Although, thinking about it, DS2 has some fairly stark moments where his constant lean endorsements seem to reveal that he's in a bad place (like, as people have pointed out, the chorus on "Slave Master" and some stuff on "I Serve the Base.") So maybe there's a hierarchy to the sort of record that's basically a concept album about being constantly fucked up, with something like Live.Love being very 2D, something like DS2 being a little more substantial, and XXX being really top-tier.
 

Courage

Member
Apr 8, 2013
17,397
2
570
Des, when I brought up XXX while evaluating Dirty Sprite 2, it was a loose, superficial comparison with the intent that both albums excel at showcasing the effects of excessive drug use to their listeners. I agree that Danny takes a more multilayered, nuanced approach, and it makes sense considering XXX is a concept album with tangible cohesion.

Future and Danny are similar in their affected cadences, over the top lyricism and sinister production. Both albums show them at a 'rock bottom' of sorts, whether it's via Future openly embracing the lifestyle or Danny being trapped in a vicious cycle. Ultimately, no one expected Future to make something as focused as XXX, but it's still valid to say he's an extreme version of himself, the same way Danny amplifies his drug-addled personality in XXX.
 

Snuggles

erotic butter maelstrom
Dec 15, 2008
39,516
0
0
33
nowhere
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What I love about DS2 and XXX is that they're neither a glorification of that lifestyle or a cautionary tale about it. They're just honest and unapologetic expression. Dark, but very human and real. Definitely resonates with me and where I'm at in life right now.
 

PhoenixDark

Banned
Sep 25, 2005
68,178
3
0
32
I'm on my phone and can't do it it...brehs, someone go to The Coli, click the Birdman thread that's stickied, and post the picture here. Just do it.
 
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