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Hideo Kojima IGN interview

Mr. Giggles

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Dec 23, 2014
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Hah!
 
Nov 19, 2013
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Good interview, he seems happy about where he is in life now.

And while the team is starting out small, let's be honest here, Kojima is an amazingly ambitious man and his games has a tendency to blow up to huge sizes. I doubt the team will still be small in a years time, when they might be ready to enter full production.
 

lantus

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Apr 15, 2009
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I'm definitely happy with where he's landed, but its not like anybody didn't think he was going to land on his feet running though. I'm curious to see when we might see this game shown and then released. Hopefully in a reasonable manner of time.
 

Screaming Meat

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Dec 10, 2012
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No need for a debate, I just don't think we're on the same page.

The difference between 'demo' and 'more focused experience' isn't semantic. A demo isn't inherently 'more focused' than that the larger experience it is demoing, unless you assume 'focused' to mean 'smaller'.

The derogatory 'paid demo' label isn't a 'framing' of a 'more focused experience', it's a separate label entirely. The reasons for seeing it as a 'demo' and the reasons for seeing it as more focused than The Phantom Pain aren't the same. 'Demo' comes from viewing it as a small vertical slice of a larger game, 'more focused' comes from viewing it as an experience that is less bloated.

Again, I really do get what you're saying but I don't think I'm explaining myself very well. One last shot!

The "paid demo" accusation in GZ's instance (and correct me if I'm wrong) was in reference to its lack of content compared to its price. That was the whole issue people had, as I recall, and that was the quick coded shorthand for saying that.

Taking that meaning, a "demo" is inherently going to be a "more focused experience" (by which I mean "concentrated"/"fixed") than its full fledged counterpart. As you mention, that's kind of the point of a demo, to show you a concentrated vertical slice of the game proper with a lot of the features and systems removed.

I understand you mean "a more focused experience" in a more absolute sense (which is why I said that the comment wasn't directed at you in particular), what I'm finding funny in a punny sort of way is that the issues people had with GZ originally are now why they like it more. Where once the lack of content meant it was considered a "paid demo", that same "issue" contributes to it now being considered "a more focused experience". It looks to me like the difference between describing a home as "cosy" as opposed to "small" and thus is most definitely a semantic issue.

Again, I do know and comprehend what you're saying. :)

TL;DR - It is funny.
 

serversurfer

Member
Aug 31, 2013
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Naughty Dog's independent. Their engine is very much their own.
Well, as mentioned, they're owned by Sony now, but Naughty Dog is actually the home of the ICE Team. While I don't think other teams really use ND's engine per se, the ICE Team actually designs the dev tools used by all first parties, and also provides them with engine modules and more. But, that stuff is mostly just for the first parties. However, the Ice Team also kinda act as the Pros from Dover, so you can bet they'll be there to provide any and all assistance Kojima needs to get up and running on PS4.

Why a Konagi exec can't just give Kojima and his team a license to use the engine they created is maddening.
If I were Kojima, I wouldn't give Konami a nickel.


Wonder if we will see something on the main stage at E3.
Really, he may not have even decided what his game is gonna be by then. Sony basically paid Highwire Games to sit around and spitball for six months before they finally decided they were making Golem.

I'm sure Kojima is full of ideas, but at the moment, he hasn't even decided where to build his studio. Then he needs to set up offices and start hiring staff. Only then can he really even begin the pre-production process of brainstorming ideas and building quick prototypes to see if they're even fun. You might trash half a dozen prototypes before you come up with something brilliant. You may never come up with something brilliant. You can't really put a schedule on pre-production.

You can (sorta) schedule production though. Once you actually know what your game is gonna be and the basic scope, you can get a fairly good idea of how long it'll take a team of X developers to produce. My guess would be that he'd want his first project to have a comparatively short production time, say 18 months, give or take. While Kojima obviously has grand dreams, it also sounds like he's eager to start getting his games out there. He's looking to kick off a new franchise, but it doesn't take a huge game to do something like that. I could see something on the scale of Demon's Souls, inFamous, etc.


I really, really wish we will get a glimpse of Kojima's new game by E3 2017 by the latest. A 2018 release date sounds like enough time to get a game out, assuming Kojima doesn't build a new engine from scratch. He should really just opt for UE4, considering it will be a PS4 and PC game.
I wouldn't be surprised if Kojima wanted to develop his own engine over time, but until that's ready, he'll just use one of the available engines. UE4 is an obvious choice, but if his plan is to focus on PlayStation development with PC ports for the foreseeable future, he could even use Sony's PhyreEngine, which is freely modifiable by PlayStation devs, can target Windows, and even iOS and Android.


They could, yes. But that may not align entirely with KojiPro's long term goal, which at this point may not involve leaning so heavily on Sony for funding and publishing. The benefits of working with a third party engine like Unreal is that it staff become accustomed to the pipeline and toolset of an engine they can use regardless of target platforms and publishing agreements. A game built on Unreal now has the long term benefit of the team being experienced should they chose to make a new game with a different partner on different platforms further down the road. Instead of having to adapt to and learn a new engine they can rest comfortably knowing their early experience with Sony has benefited their workflow in the long term.
I don't think throwing a bunch of contracted Sony staff at the project would necessarily be what Kojima wants. It's a bit fanfiction, but reading into what Kojima says seems to imply he wants to get back to more personalised, less industrialised work. The guy has been bolted to massive Metal Gear projects for over a decade, all of which have gotten bigger and bigger as he not-so-subtly laments not working on other franchises. Now he has no choice other than to work closer with a tight nit team on an entirely new idea with a publisher that's actually going to let him do it. Often working within perceived limitations (staff and budget) can do wonders for the creative process, rather than working on yet another 300-man AAA behemoth.

Plus, you know, despite the senior member experience this is entirely new startings for KojiPro. I'd rather see Kojima and co really pour themselves into a project they can manage and are passionate about at the expense of logistical development size in favour of a more passionately woven creative work, then once the studio has found its footing then can blow up into bigger things.

Let the dude breath a bit basically.
I agree with all of this. Sony make an excellent friend and ally, but Kojima wants to be his own man now. Doing 2nd-party work for Sony is just an excellent way to get his new company off the ground. He doesn't want KojiPro to be limited to game development regardless, actually.


And probably the best financial remuneration.
Yup. I don't even speak Japanese, but you could tell all the dude cares about is getting paid.
 
Sep 20, 2005
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Well, as mentioned, they're owned by Sony now, but Naughty Dog is actually the home of the Ice Team. While I don't think other teams really use ND's engine per se, the ICE Team actually designs the dev tools used by all first parties, and also provides them with engine modules and more. But, that stuff is mostly just for the first parties. However, the Ice Team also kinda act as the Pros from Dover, so you can bet they'll be there to provide any and all assistance Kojima needs to get up and running on PS4.


If I were Kojima, I wouldn't give Konami a nickel.



Really, he may not have even decided what his game is gonna be by then. Sony basically paid Highwire Games to sit around and spitball for six months before they finally decided they were making Golem.

I'm sure Kojima is full of ideas, but at the moment, he hasn't even decided where to build his studio. Then he needs to set up offices and start hiring staff. Only then can he really even begin the pre-production process of brainstorming ideas and building quick prototypes to see if they're even fun. You might trash half a dozen prototypes before you come up with something brilliant. You may never come up with something brilliant. You can't really put a schedule on pre-production.

You can (sorta) schedule production though. Once you actually know what your game is gonna be and the basic scope, you can get a fairly good idea of how long it'll take a team of X developers to produce. My guess would be that he'd want his first project to have a comparatively short production time, say 18 months, give or take. While Kojima obviously has grand dreams, it also sounds like he's eager to start getting his games out there. He's looking to kick off a new franchise, but it doesn't take a huge game to do something like that. I could see something on the scale of Demon's Souls, inFamous, etc.



I wouldn't be surprised if Kojima wanted to develop his own engine over time, but until that's ready, he'll just use one of the available engines. UE4 is an obvious choice, but if his plan is to focus on PlayStation development with PC ports for the foreseeable future, he could even use Sony's PhyreEngine, which is freely modifiable by PlayStation devs, can target Windows, and even iOS and Android.




I agree with all of this. Sony make an excellent friend and ally, but Kojima wants to be his own man now. Doing 2nd-party work for Sony is just an excellent way to get his new company off the ground. He doesn't want KojiPro to be limited to game development regardless, actually.



Yup. I don't even speak Japanese, but you could tell all the dude cares about is getting paid.


A Kojima Souls style game would be interesting.

I just wanted to say Kojima Souls.