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Social Opinion Cringe If you could live in a specific time period, what would it be?

which one

  • 40's

    Votes: 2 3.4%
  • 50's

    Votes: 2 3.4%
  • 60's

    Votes: 8 13.6%
  • 70's

    Votes: 3 5.1%
  • 80's

    Votes: 19 32.2%
  • 90's

    Votes: 4 6.8%
  • 00's

    Votes: 8 13.6%
  • something else

    Votes: 13 22.0%

  • Total voters
    59

Elektro_Demon

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Nov 9, 2019
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So if you had the chance to select a specific time period and live in it, what would it be?
I would choose to be in the born in 1955, so that I would have 15 years in 1970. I just love that period, 70's 80's and 90's.
I'd like to live in the 70's. It was a much better time, everything was simpler etc. I really like that period.
What about you, what time period would you choose? Or maybe you just like the way it is now. Do tell.
 

Thurible

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Aug 15, 2018
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I've put a choice called something else in the poll.
But yeah, looking at it right now, it might be a bit too much leaned towards 20th century.
Didn't mean to offend, just wanted more variety. A lot of great stuff happened during the last century, but there are other periods of time I personally find fascinating. Living in the victorian era would be interesting for example. Lots of social hierarchies, upheavals, and etiquette.
 

DeafTourette

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Apr 23, 2018
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I would never live in the past. If anything, I'd live in the future.

What I look like being a black man living in any decade before 1990? And I lived through the 70s (as a baby/toddler), 80s and 90s... I'd rather live in the future.
 
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-Arcadia-

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Aug 20, 2019
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I like this time and place, and the people in it, so I wouldn’t leave it, but if I could take an extended vacation with time travel or something? Probably as early in the 20th century as possible, maybe even before the 40s.

I would just love to visit what would be a whole other world and culture.

Close second is the 60s/70s. Trouble spots aside, it just seems like such a cozy time. The modern era is nice and far away, but it’s also beginning in some fun, interesting ways. There’s just something about that in-between vibe. It would also be amazing to watch the moon mission live... on my bunny ears TV, lol.
 

PanzerAzel

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Oct 31, 2019
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I am alive solely for the reason that I was lucky enough to be born in a time when medical advancements provided me with treatments that aided my survival. I wouldn’t have made it past my mid twenties, at best, without chemo.

Plus, gaming today kicks ass.
 
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Stiflers Mom

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Have lived through the 80ies and 90ies, and I concur, it was a great time.
Personally though, I always kind of idealized the 60ies.
Cars, women and generally everything looked at their best in that time period.
 
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lock2k

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Have lived through the 80ies and 90ies, and I concur, it was a great time.
Personally though, I always kind of idealized the 60ies.
Cars, women and generally everything looked at their best in that time period.
I admit I'm curious about the sixties. I love the bands of that time period and a lot of the stuff I loved during the 90's were 60's revivals. I also grew up listening to the stuff my mom listened to in the 60's and my favorite movie of all time if Planet of the Apes (the original). I lived through the 80's and 90's but I'm curious about 60's and 70's.
 

V4skunk

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Go back 12,000 year, see what the crack was with ancient civilizations building megaliths that we can't even replicate today with our tech.
 
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lock2k

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Go back 12,000 year, see what the crack was with ancient civilizations building megaliths that we can't even replicate today with our tech.
True. Or even go back further than that, try to see if the dinosaurs were really like (from a distance), etc. Provided we could get back to our times.
 

Lanrutcon

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Feb 19, 2014
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Go back 12,000 year, see what the crack was with ancient civilizations building megaliths that we can't even replicate today with our tech.
Pretty sure we can replicate anything that's ever been built because of our tech. We have a far superior understanding of engineering and construction materials, access to an array of machines backed by supporting infrastructure and a grasp of physics that exceeds that of the ancient world by orders of magnitude.

Whenever someone asks how some of those structures were built, they're asking how it was built then, using the technology and knowledge of the time. If we had to construct a pyramid today, for example, it would be child's play due to cranes alone. The stuff they're doing in Dubai is way more advanced and impressive.
 

V4skunk

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True. Or even go back further than that, try to see if the dinosaurs were really like (from a distance), etc. Provided we could get back to our times.
If we are to believe conspiracy! Dinosaurs existed at least up until the last ice age, around 12,000 years ago. Angkor Wat in Cambodia even has dinosaurs enscribed on their temples, Google it.
 
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V4skunk

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Pretty sure we can replicate anything that's ever been built because of our tech. We have a far superior understanding of engineering and construction materials, access to an array of machines backed by supporting infrastructure and a grasp of physics that exceeds that of the ancient world by orders of magnitude.

Whenever someone asks how some of those structures were built, they're asking how it was built then, using the technology and knowledge of the time. If we had to construct a pyramid today, for example, it would be child's play due to cranes alone. The stuff they're doing in Dubai is way more advanced and impressive.
You obviously know zero about construction. Or the moh's scale of hardness.
The ancients were perfectly cutting and moving stone way beyond our capability. Specifically granite rock, some pieces weighing over 1650 tonne like the stone of the pregnant woman. Or the 1000tonne trilithon stones in the base of the temple of Apollo.
 
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Lanrutcon

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If we are to believe conspiracy! Dinosaurs existed at least up until the last ice age, around 12,000 years ago. Angkor Wat in Cambodia even has dinosaurs enscribed on their temples, Google it.
Life finds a way. Wouldn't surprise me if some species were too stubborn to go down with the rest of them. You get some crazy lifeforms on this planet.
 
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Lanrutcon

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You obviously know zero about construction. Or the moh's scale of hardness.
The ancients were perfectly cutting and moving stone way beyond our capability.
And you'll be providing receipts for that hilarious statement, right?

I'd love to know what stone they could move that we can't with today's tech.
 
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lock2k

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If we are to believe conspiracy! Dinosaurs existed at least up until the last ice age, around 12,000 years ago. Angkor Wat in Cambodia even has dinosaurs enscribed on their temples, Google it.
Hey, color me curious, I will google it now. Seriously, sometimes I feel so small when I try to solve all the mysteries of the earth and the universe. It's fucking fascinating to say the least.
 
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Lanrutcon

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I edited my post. Research for your self.
Edit:
The heaviest man-made object ever moved is the Gullfaks C installation, whose displacement during its tow to the Gullfaks field, in the northern part of the Norwegian North Sea, was between 1.4 and 1.5 million tonnes
he heaviest object lifted on land is a portion of the North Rankin B Platform which weighs 23,178 tonnes (51.1 million lb) and was lifted to a height of 26.5 m (86.9 ft) at the shipyard of Hyundai Heavy Industries in Ulsan, South Korea, on 17 October 2011.
On the day of its initial launch in May 1911 from the Belfast shipyard where it was built, the Titanic became the biggest object ever moved by humans up until that time. The ship, which at the time was still being finished, weighed roughly 26,000 tons (23,587 metric tons).
In January 2012, Al-Majdouie, which describes itself as a project logistics and supply chain company -- a fancy way of saying it moves stuff -- transported a giant device called an evaporator down a road to a water desalination plant being built in Saudi Arabia. Unfortunately, the company's press release doesn't detail the distance that the machinery traveled, but it does tell us that it was pretty darned huge -- the length of a football field and 4,891 tons (4,437 metric tons) in weight -- which makes it slightly bigger than the Hotel Montgomery.
Big space rockets are used to transport satellites and manned spaceships into orbit, but before they can do that, somebody has to wheel them into place on the launching pad. And as you might imagine, the immense Saturn V rocket that NASA used to send astronauts to the Moon in the late 1960s to mid-1970s was quite a load to move.The Saturn V was 363 feet (110.6 meters) tall, which made it 60 feet (18.3 meters) bigger than the Statue of Liberty, and when fully loaded with fuel for liftoff, it tipped the scale at 3,100 tons (2,812 metric tons).
1000 tonnes hasn't been a problem for ages now, as you can see.
 

V4skunk

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1000 tonnes hasn't been a problem for ages now, as you can see.
You are thinking completely backwards.
How were the ancients perfectly cutting granite rock with copper hand tools and then moving stones up to 1750 tonne?
At the end of the day there is a reason why we build using bricks, steel and concrete and not granite rock like the ancients.
 
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Lanrutcon

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You are thinking completely backwards.
How were the ancients perfectly cutting granite rock with copper hand tools and then moving stones up to 1750 tonne?
Oh hold up now, cupcake. What happened to your original claim?

Go back 12,000 year, see what the crack was with ancient civilizations building megaliths that we can't even replicate today with our tech.
That's right: it got fucking destroyed by actual facts. Care to comment as I save your bold (but terribly stupid) statement to the Tales From Your Ass vault?
 

xrnzaaas

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I'm the kind of guy who'd prefer to live in the future rather than in the past, even if the future is looking somewhat scary due to things like climate change and people's privacy slowly being taken from them.
 

V4skunk

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Oh hold up now, cupcake. What happened to your original claim?



That's right: it got fucking destroyed by actual facts. Care to comment as I save your bold (but terribly stupid) statement to the Tales From Your Ass vault?
Like I said you don't understand construction.
It would be almost impossible, extortionate in cost even to cut and move a super size granite stone. Granite has incredibly weak torsion strength and snaps under its own weight.
Imagine placing a 100cm ruler on a desk! And moving the ruler so 70cm is hanging over the desk! That would snap a granite rock the same size as the 100cm ruler.
There are also places like Sacsayhuaman in Peru where each rock was individually cut to size as part of a huge jigsaw puzzle wall, Google it for your self, defies our knowledge because it is very very hard and time consuming to do.
Again we use bricks, steel and concrete that all erode away with 200 years
 
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Lanrutcon

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Like I said you don't understand construction.
It would be almost impossible, extortionate in cost even to cut and move a super size granite stone. Granite has incredibly weak torsion strength and snaps under its own weight.
Imagine placing a 100cm ruler on a desk! And moving the ruler so 70cm is hanging over the desk! That would snap a granite rock the same size as the 100cm ruler.
We can move over a million tones. Moving 1000 would be simple. We have the machines and the knowledge. You still haven't provided any evidence we can't, while there's a metric fuckton that we can. Imagine placing a 100cm ruler not on a desk, but on one of the many specialized vehicles we have in service today that can support it (and so much more) during transport. Maybe I don't understand construction, but you seem to not understand Google or common sense.

There are also places like Sacsayhuaman in Peru where each rock was individually cut to size as part of a huge jigsaw puzzle wall, Google it for your self, defies our knowledge because it is very very hard and time consuming to do.
We have the technology to engrave writing into the edge of a razor. We can cut rock with precision. Try harder.

Again we use bricks, steel and concrete that all erode away with 200 years
Again, what we use and how long it lasts is irrelevant when we can recreate anything that has been done previously. What materials we use for modern construction isn't based on some ruin in Peru. I say this, but I know you'll just keep trying to shift the goal posts away from your original (and still highly stupid) statement. What else have you got?
 

GymWolf

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The years when everyone was on ganja or at least it wasn't demonized like today, it was 60s or 70s??
That or the future we saw in scifi movies.
 
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kunonabi

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Born in 83 and pretty happy with it. I could probably do with being born in 79 or 80.

70s would be a close second.
 
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#Phonepunk#

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'60s sounds so dope. new albums by The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. $5 concerts. free love and free drugs. anti war protests. end the decade watching a man landing on the fucking moon. holy shit what a decade.
The ancients were perfectly cutting and moving stone way beyond our capability. Specifically granite rock, some pieces weighing over 1650 tonne like the stone of the pregnant woman. Or the 1000tonne trilithon stones in the base of the temple of Apollo.
ive been reading up on Egyptian Pyramidions. they had a habit of carving these from meteorites:



pretty dope the skills they had back then.
 
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synchronicity

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Of recent history, it would be the 20's. I've always felt a strong draw, almost like I've lived another life in the jazz joints of the era.
 

lil puff

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I'm good with being born in the 70s.

My parents have awful stories of the 50s and 60s that I wouldn't want any part of, and I also have some fear for future generations around the world, unless we start getting our shit together right now.
 

V4skunk

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We can move over a million tones. Moving 1000 would be simple. We have the machines and the knowledge. You still haven't provided any evidence we can't, while there's a metric fuckton that we can. Imagine placing a 100cm ruler not on a desk, but on one of the many specialized vehicles we have in service today that can support it (and so much more) during transport. Maybe I don't understand construction, but you seem to not understand Google or common sense.



We have the technology to engrave writing into the edge of a razor. We can cut rock with precision. Try harder.



Again, what we use and how long it lasts is irrelevant when we can recreate anything that has been done previously. What materials we use for modern construction isn't based on some ruin in Peru. I say this, but I know you'll just keep trying to shift the goal posts away from your original (and still highly stupid) statement. What else have you got?
My original post:
V4skunk said:
You are thinking completely backwards.
How were the ancients perfectly cutting granite rock with copper hand tools and then moving stones up to 1750 tonne?

You are the one changing the goal posts comrade.
The simple fact is that we are not cutting 1750 tonne granite blocks, granite is the 2nd hardest natural substance known to man.
You also prove my point with the link that i posted! Go look again at the size of the heavy lifters, you need to try harder to be honest. Also a laser is not going to cut a 1000+tonne block, more like a thin sheet of metal a few cm thick at best.
We are also not replicating the walls at Sacsayhuaman any time soon.
 
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manfestival

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The world has become so much more progressive and civilized that while it is romantic to think of the past as being so amazing. I would rather keep moving forward to see what the future brings. So if future is not really an option then maybe the last decade again since it was a blast.
 

freak of nature

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Dec 9, 2019
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Honestly... It might sound ridiculous but given my physical deformities I'd be much suited to living in archaic times.

When man was a caveman.

I wouldn't be looked at as a freakshow and my physical development would be an evolutionary advantage... As opposed to it being the opposite today.
 

Lanrutcon

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My original post:
V4skunk said:
You are thinking completely backwards.
How were the ancients perfectly cutting granite rock with copper hand tools and then moving stones up to 1750 tonne?

You are the one changing the goal posts comrade.
The simple fact is that we are not cutting 1750 tonne granite blocks, granite is the 2nd hardest natural substance known to man.
You also prove my point with the link that i posted! Go look again at the size of the heavy lifters, you need to try harder to be honest. Also a laser is not going to cut a 1000+tonne block, more like a thin sheet of metal a few cm thick at best.
We are also not replicating the walls at Sacsayhuaman any time soon.
And now you're just straight up lying. Your original post: (reminding you for the second time)

Go back 12,000 year, see what the crack was with ancient civilizations building megaliths that we can't even replicate today with our tech.
And you have still no provided any proof of anything we can't replicate. Every single feat you've named has been topped and beaten into the ground. Every single metric you've named has been achieved, and then improved upon by modern technology. Granite is excavated every day of the week across the world. We figured out how to cut that shit, and then moved on. If you think that shaping a large rock is somehow beyond us in 2020 when we're literally moving entire buildings then you're an idiot. That link you posted showed several machines capable of easily doing what you claimed could not be done. Do you want me to remind of you that post too? You seem to conveniently forget when you say stupid things that are rapidly disproved.

And no, we wouldn't use a laser to cut stone: lasers are for precision work. Hence the razor blade. Only took me 2 goddamn minutes to Google and find out how channeling granite blocks out is routine in quarries worldwide.