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Games NeoGAF Official SEGA SATURN Community

cireza

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Jun 1, 2014
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I have received my Saturn ALL-IN-ONE cartridge and it works perfectly well. This is a Pseudo Saturn with a switch, allowing to choose between 4 Meg RAM, 1 Meg RAM or Memory Cartridge, as well as all the current functions of the Pseudo Saturn (playing burnt game).

This is a must have, as I can finally do everything with a single cartridge. No need to change anything, which is a good point as the cartridge port is quite fragile on Saturn, so you should not swap too often.

I have tried Symphony of the Night in English. That's awesome ! The game runs in very well, and finally being able to play in English is awesome.

There have been some great efforts lately, so it is a great moment to enjoy some Saturn gaming ! Vandal Hearts is also available in English.
 
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InfiniteCombo

Member
Jan 26, 2014
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I have received my Saturn ALL-IN-ONE cartridge and it works perfectly well. This is a Pseudo Saturn with a switch, allowing to choose between 4 Meg RAM, 1 Meg RAM or Memory Cartridge, as well as all the current functions of the Pseudo Saturn (playing burnt game).

This is a must have, as I can finally do everything with a single cartridge. No need to change anything, which is a good point as the cartridge port is quite fragile on Saturn, so you should not swap too often.

I have tried Symphony of the Night in English. That's awesome ! The game runs in very well, and finally being able to play in English is awesome.

There have been some great efforts lately, so it is a great moment to enjoy some Saturn gaming ! Vandal Hearts is also available in English.

Huh, I didn't know this "ALL-IN-ONE" cart was a thing. I should look into it. I have some pretty expensive games (looking at you, Radiant Silvergun!) that I actually play, and may want to create backups of those games so that I don't have to use the actual discs.

Glad you're enjoying SotN, fantastic game. I know the Saturn version gets some crap for supposedly being inferior to the PlayStation version (which is the one I own), but how bad are those issues, really?
 

cireza

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Huh, I didn't know this "ALL-IN-ONE" cart was a thing. I should look into it. I have some pretty expensive games (looking at you, Radiant Silvergun!) that I actually play, and may want to create backups of those games so that I don't have to use the actual discs.

Glad you're enjoying SotN, fantastic game. I know the Saturn version gets some crap for supposedly being inferior to the PlayStation version (which is the one I own), but how bad are those issues, really?
SOTN on Saturn has the following problems :
- Biggest one : 256x224 graphic assets were stretched to 320x224 which results in some ugly stuff on screen (columns that are doubled), also applies to sprites. Not great really. I think that some work could mitigate these problems.
- Minor : some transparencies are missing, some slowdown
- Bonus : two areas, Maria, a couple familiars I think, boots to run faster if I am correct

That's pretty much all I have to say. I don't care about the minor one honestly. However the visuals being stretched really distract me. I can't help but notice that every single diagonal is not diagonal anymore, as well as these "doubled columns" on Alucard's sprite, making him quite ugly.

Otherwise, game plays perfectly well really. The novelty here being the English version of course. I have been playing Saturn for more than 20 years so I know this console by heart... Always to rediscover some stuff.

For now, I would not recommend this patch, there are still improvements to be made (game crashes when you reach a blue door for example). But it is very promising.
 
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DT MEDIA

GAF's Resident Saturn Omnibus
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DT MEDIA DT MEDIA - Your passion for, and knowledge of, the Sega Saturn is truly impressive. Subbed to this thread.

If Saturn games weren't ridiculously expensive, I'd certainly own more games for it. Right now my collection (practically all imports from Japan, played on a US system) is fairly small/modest, but I love all of the games I own. X-Men vs Street Fighter and Vampire Savior are highlights for me.

Like, for example, if it wasn't going for $500+ (at least last time I checked), I would get Super Tempo -- It's without a question one of the most beautiful pixel art games I've ever seen in my life. And the gameplay, centered around a musical motif, is just icing on the cake:


One final note on the Saturn -- Not only do I own and actively play one now, but I have fond memories of it. I remember going to a cousin's house, and he had a Saturn with King of Fighters '95 on it. To this day, that experience blows my mind. 3 on 3, with great characters and great art, all with minimal loading? What is this sorcery? My cousin explained that it's why it needed the cart on the back. The experience was so formative that years later I ended up hunting for a copy of KoF '95 just to have it, and that's where my Saturn collection started...


Thanks for the kind words. I've worked hard to make the Sega Saturn Community forum the definitive blog for Sega's Gen-5 console. As always, I would recommend reading through the pages for detailed reviews, screenshots, videos and screenshots of many beloved Saturn classics. I did write about Super Tempo a couple years ago and greatly enjoyed it. It's easily one of the standout 2D videogames for the system, and it's unfortunate that physical copies are so rare and expensive. You'll have to use alternative means (cough, ahem) if you want to play. And it goes without saying that I highly encourage Red Entertainment (or whoever owns their catalog) to reissue this game for modern platforms.

Don't forget the "Essentials" posts on pages 1 and 9. I will write an "Essentials 3" at some point, but these two are an excellent introduction to what makes Sega Saturn so special.
 

DT MEDIA

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Yesterday, I received my latest Saturn game: Konami's J. League Jikkyou Honoo no Striker, released in February 1998 in Japan. It was created by the company's Sapporo studio, who were also responsible for the Saturn translation of Genso Suikoden and the Tokimeki Memorial puzzle game. They were a relatively obscure team that produced solid work.

Here are photos of the front and back covers, as well as several pages from the manual describing the gameplay and controls. This game is based on Konami's International Superstar Soccer franchise, and follows one year after J. League Perfect Striker arrived on Nintendo 64, which was released in the West as International Superstar Soccer 64. Perfect Striker 3, 4 and 5 arrived on Playstation 2, while the Playstation 1's games were based on the Winning Eleven series. There is also Jikkyou World Soccer series, which began on the 16-bit systems and continued through N64, PSX and PS2.

Whew! This is a confusing franchise.

Where does this Sega Saturn edition fit into all of this? I find its gameplay is closer to the arcade style of the 16-bit International Superstar Soccer titles, not as much the simulation bent of ISS Pro/Winning Eleven, which is where the genre was headed by 1998. It reminds me a lot of Sega's Worldwide Soccer/Victory Goal series and in a very good way. The visual design is very similar with bold, bright colors and a supremely confident 3D graphics engine, player models are very solid and sport some nice animations, and the action is very brisk and nimble on its feet.

As this is a Japanese soccer game, it features the J. League instead of international teams. There are 17 teams in total and each team has their own stadium (including an 18 Konami Stadium), which was a real surprise for me, as well as their own fan chants. Audio commentary is very impressive and I often find that this sort of thing works better in Japanese than English, thanks to their shorter sentences.

I haven't yet played enough to really say where this one sits among Saturn's large library of soccer games, but it's definitely among the top tier. Once again, we see that Japanese programmers are achieving far better results than their Western counterparts. Graphics are smooth and crisp with a solid 30 fps, and I can't help but wonder why American and UK coders couldn't pull this off. I strongly suspect it all comes down to Assembly versus C, where Saturn is far more adept at the former than the latter.

I bought my copy for five bucks, essentially paying only for shipping. I have picked up a number of Saturn games this way, and it's often a matter of good timing. Once again, I strongly advise purchasing sports titles, as these are among the most affordable in the system's library and are perfect for social gatherings. It's wild that I could have Striker and World Cup France 98 for the price of a burger and fries.

Here's a gameplay video to keep you entertained. Enjoy!


 
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DT MEDIA

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J. League Jikkyou Honoo no Striker Screenshot Extravanza

As promised, here is a large collection of in-game screenshots from Konami's excellent 1998 soccer game (courtesy of my too-sharp-for-its-own-good iPhone Xr). If you're a fan of International Superstar Soccer on the Super NES and Genesis, you'll absolutely love this game. It's a pure arcade fun with 32-bit flair and 16-bit action and I couldn't ask for anything more.

Flaming Striker (to translate into English) is surprisingly robust with gameplay features, including exhibition, season, tournament and all-star modes. 17 J. League teams are present, as well as an original Konami team. You will also notice six mystery spaces on the club select screen, suggesting these are unlockable teams. One to four players are supported, and you can all play as a team against the computer. A cpu-vs-cpu watch mode is also available, which is how I took some of these photos.

One very nice feature is Training Mode. This is a collection of mini-game drills that cover dribbling, passing, shooting, free kicks, corner kicks and defense. You have to score a set number of points in order to pass to the next level, and there are at least three skill levels for each section. It's a terrific way to hone your skills and come to grips with the controls, and it all has a nice Nintendo Wii vibe.

Controls are standard for soccer games, with running, sprinting, passing, shooting, tackling and sliding. Another notable feature in this game is the "Action" button which allows for context-sensitive special moves. This includes evasive dribbling, defensive tackles, head shots and bicycle kicks.

The tone in Flaming Striker is to keep everything simple and easy to play, perfectly suited for fans of classic arcade soccer titles. Again, it feels so much like an evolution of the early 16-bit ISS games and it's an interesting choice when the genre was shifting decisively towards simulations. EA and Konami would battle for supremacy on the Playstation, and they would become the main soccer rivals through the PS2 era with FIFA and Pro Evolution/Winning Eleven. Diehard sports fans greatly preferred the more serious approach, becoming increasingly hostile towards "arcade" soccer games. You can see this in the surprisingly harsh reviews from European gaming magazines (which you can read at Sega Retro). In Japan, Sega Saturn Magazine was far more supportive, with its three-party reviewers scoring it 8-8-5. Again, you can see the mixed reception.

Personally, at this stage in my life, I prefer arcade games over hardcore sims, especially on Sega Saturn. I have FIFA 11 and PES 2013 on Nintendo Wii, and to be honest, I've hardly ever touched them. Too complicated, too much work, probably worth the investment if I put in the time, but life is short and I don't seem to have the patience. I think the key is that I've always played soccer videogames like they're hockey, and I'm not too keen on the subtle nuances of the sport, the ballet of players dancing around one another. I just want to run up and down the field, knock opposing defenders unconscious with soccer balls to the head and scoring lots of goals. I am not in the mood for fast action, low scoring and ties.

Finally, we will once again note how skillfully Japanese software teams could handle Saturn's complex hardware (you just want to hit EA's coders over the head with a rolled up newspaper). This game runs at a smooth 30 fps with detailed polygon players and arenas. The color commentary is very good, if repetitive, the many features are very welcome and the whole presentation is highly polished. I'm honestly surprised that Konami put in the effort for a 1998 Saturn videogame. One would expect either a lazy port or a slapdash effort to kick out the door for a quick buck, but they honestly put in their best effort, and it shows. This may be Konami's best Saturn title, although Policenauts quietly beckons from my closet shelf. If anything, this game is going to make you even angrier at Konami Nagoya for their lazy bones Castlevania port.

I picked up this game for 99 cents plus four bucks shipping. That is an absolute steal. Is this on the same level as ISS Pro Evolution 98 on Playstation? Eh, I wouldn't quite go that far. Let's not get ahead of ourselves. But for sheer bubblegum pop, this Saturn effort can't be beat.
 
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DT MEDIA

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There's always time for a quick round of golf, and Pebble Beach Golf Links remains the best outing on Sega Saturn. I really do miss T & E Soft and their golf sims. The always managed to capture the realism of the sport while keeping everything highly colorful and cheerful. It's such a welcome alternative to the grim and monochrome PGA/Tiger Woods franchise. They really hit their stride during Generation 5, and if you're a fan of the Links series on PC, or Golden Tee in the arcades, this is right up your alley.

I love this game for two reasons: Craig Stadler and Elevator Music. Stadler's presence goes beyond the then-standard practice of appearing on the title screen and cashing a royalty check. He provides video commentary on all 18 holes of Pebble Beach, and it has a great off-the-cuff feel that doesn't sound at all scripted. He also appears as an in-game character who plays alongside you, making endless quips, bits of advice and irritating nudges that reminds you of hitting the links with a friend who's just a little bit better than you and will never, ever let you forget that. It's enough to make you want to run him over with the golf cart.

And then there's the music. I absolutely love the elevator music in this game, which sounds just like the smooth jazz that was so common in the 1970s. This was the sort of music you'd hear at family restaurants or doctors' waiting rooms. You probably have to be a certain age to feel nostalgic about that sound, which was remembered about as fondly as Velvet Elvis and Big Eyes. Whatever. The songs are catchy and melodic and will always put a happy grin on your face. It's the perfect antidote for the most frustrating sport ever created, and is probably the only thing keeping you from hurling your game controller out the window.
 

Phobos Base

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Being a complete moron, I recently bought a copy of Doom, and it sure is an experience. In static screenshots it looks ok, if not as detailed as the PS1 version, there's a good selection of levels and the pad feels ideal for it. But the framerate is beyond atrocious, rendering it completely unplayable. They tried to compensate by making the weapons fire faster, but all that does is make you waste more ammo and makes any sort of strategy pointless. It is the first non-vr game I've ever played that gave me motion sickness though, so I guess that's an achievement. Can't begin to image what the people who bought it new must have felt.
 
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DT MEDIA

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Since I brought up Pebble Beach Golf Links, I wanted to take a look at the three T&E Soft golf sims that were released exclusively in Japan. It's unfortunate that none of these were given a Western release, but it's understandable as Pebble Beach and Valora Valley Golf--the company's fantasy golf game--were probably not commercial successes. In addition, the market was already swamped with golf games that, in the style of the time, "looked better." Translation: they all used 3D polygon graphics and no digitized characters or colorful elevator music. Oh, well, some of them are pretty good, and at least we can all agree that EA's PGA Tour 97 is terrible and depressing.




First, we have Masters: Harukanaru Augusta 3, released in September 1995. It is essentially identical to Pebble Beach except that it takes place at Augusta. The in-game visuals are slightly more refined, particularly in the trees. Sadly, Craig Stadler does not appear, and his absence is sorely missed, but your caddies will make appearances to offer kind words of encouragement from time to time. This game received a warm reception from Sega Saturn Magazine JP, scoring 9-8-7 in the review.




Next up, we have Waialae no Kiseki: Extra 36 Holes, released in February 1997 and features the Waialae Country Club in Hawaii. It was founded in 1927 and has been the home of the PGA Hawaiian Open since 1965. This game features this course, plus two additional original courses, hence the title. The same graphics engine is used once again, although there are one or two new golfers added to the mix. I would also like to point out that the Waialae Club logo looks exactly like the emblem on Luke Skywalker's X-Wing helmet. Am I the only one who's noticed this? Sega Saturn Magazine gave this title a 7-8-8.




Finally, we close out with Junclassic C.C. & Rope Club. This was released in December 1997 and features two Japanese country clubs. The game features video tours of both locations, which is a nice little touch and was probably used as a promotional tool. Thankfully, the graphics engine has finally been given an upgrade, and it's a very welcome sight. Everything has been given an overhaul, from the menus to the in-game visuals, and the addition of rolling clouds is a particularly nice touch. In addition, each course features three different routes for a total of 108 holes. Sega Saturn Magazine was less generous this time, giving review scores of 7-6-6.

T&E Soft were skilled veterans in video golf, and so there's a solid consistency across all of their Saturn titles. Controls and gameplay options are identical throughout the series, so anyone familiar with Pebble Beach will hit the ground running. Prices for used copies range from $15-$40, with Junclassic being the most expensive.
 
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Komatsu

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I have received my Saturn ALL-IN-ONE cartridge and it works perfectly well. This is a Pseudo Saturn with a switch, allowing to choose between 4 Meg RAM, 1 Meg RAM or Memory Cartridge, as well as all the current functions of the Pseudo Saturn (playing burnt game).

This is a must have, as I can finally do everything with a single cartridge. No need to change anything, which is a good point as the cartridge port is quite fragile on Saturn, so you should not swap too often.

I have tried Symphony of the Night in English. That's awesome ! The game runs in very well, and finally being able to play in English is awesome.

There have been some great efforts lately, so it is a great moment to enjoy some Saturn gaming ! Vandal Hearts is also available in English.

I use one of those All-in-1 carts with my modded Saturn - the one in which I installed the TERRAONION MODE - and they're great.

With Lunar and VH out, it's the best it's been for us Saturn owners in years.
 
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DT MEDIA

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Here is a true hidden gem on Sega Saturn that most of you have likely never discovered. It's a shoot-em-up called Psyth, and it appears as a bonus mini-game in Konami's dating sim Tokimeki Memorial: Forever With You. As far as arcade shooters go, this isn't anything special, very much in the 16-bit style, but it's always great to see Konami doing what they did best, and what's here looks great, with lots of bold colors and VDP2 transparency effects.

The only downside, of course, is that only a single stage exists. I really wish Konami had commissioned a full-length version of this and released it to arcades and home formats.
 

DT MEDIA

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Grandia Digital Museum is a terrific fan-service tribute by Game Arts that followed the release of Grandia in Japan. It features a database of characters and monsters, a collection of production art assets, and best of all, a short extension of the main game where the main characters must retrieve missing objects from a museum.

I don't yet know if TrekkiesUnite has any plans to translate Digital Museum, and it would terrific if that happened, but I think you'll be fine without English text after playing the main game.

I grabbed these screenshots and animated clips from Resetera, which had a very nice thread on Sega Saturn games. I'm sure they won't mind. Note the first clip with those spectacular water effects, only seen on Sega Saturn. Even the new remaster on Nintendo Switch fails to recreate this effect (as they essentially upgraded the inferior Playstation version). This videogame is such a painstaking labor of love, and you can see how much work Game Arts put into its creation.

Don't forget that the Grandia english translation is almost fully complete. Be sure to download the patch and play, because you're missing out on one of Saturn's all-time greatest videogames--ranked second in the 2000 Sega Saturn Magazine poll.
 
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DT MEDIA

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Here are some excellent screenshots of the gloriously stylish Terra Phantastica in action. This is a late 1996 Strategy-RPG published by Sega and developed by a studio named Chime, who were later assigned the honor of Dragon Force 2 in 1998. If you're a fan of any of the major genre titles on the system, you are absolutely going to love this one. Sega Saturn Magazine JP scored it 9-8-7 in their review, and the title was later reissued under the Satakore (SegaSaturn Collection).

I borrowed this photos from Resetera forum, "The Greatest SRPG You've Never Played." Here, member "Encephelon" describes the storyline and gameplay mechanics. I will quote some excerpts below:


I'm convinced that Terra Phantastica on the Saturn is an unappreciated classic. This isn't a game that has a following in Japan, but failed to catch on in the west. You'll find maybe one or two playthroughs on Nico Nico Douga. But I think it's great, and I'd like to make the argument for it.

Presentation wise, Terra Phantastica isn't a show stopper, but there's a lot to love about the game's visuals. It's a rich, colorful game, with a wide variety of large, detailed sprites, each with a series of animations. There are loading screens every time you engage in battle, but they're so stylishly designed, they manage to be one of the more charming, memorable elements of the game.

[The story] features Kingdom of Mais, which is part of a larger empire, and the numerous conflicts it gets itself mixed into throughout the game. In the beginning of the game, the young prince Alexis comes across a nameless statue in a nearby temple. Not long after he decides to name her "Diine" (I don't know how to transliterate this name. Looking it up in Japanese supposedly brings up the Farsi word for "Zoroastrianism," but I'm unable to check, and am not sure that's where they got it from). demons come to attack the kingdom, the statue comes to life, and serves as the main character throughout the game.The two can be seen riding horseback on the brilliant illustration on the cover. Each chapter, Alexis comes to Diine for her insight regarding a topic that concerns the kingdom, and depending on the advice you give him, Alexis grows differently as a ruler (one or two hidden stats - compassion, bravery, and knowledge will increase). Depending these attributes, the ending you get will differ. The story is full of mystery and coded statements, but I don't recall it going anywhere. But that might just be because I didn't get one of the better endings.

Terra Phantastica is a bit like Langrisser, in that you're not just a single character on the battle field - one character commands a number of units. But unlike Langrisser, the units are effectively a replacement for your commander's "health." You can't see your troops on the battlefield, but when you engage in battle, your "SP" (soldier points) are represented by the number of units on the screen. Choose to attack the enemy, and the troops that that character is commanding will attack the enemy character's troops. Logically, each unit lost means less damage output.

Then there's positioning. Positioning matters a great deal more than your average SRPG. It's more than "attack from behind for more damage," though that's also at play here. If you attack from head on, you'll be able to attack 3 times, but so will the enemy. Attack from the side, and they lose one of those turns. From behind, and they get 1 move. But also important is being able to retreat, which any character can do if nothing is behind them. That means always making sure you have room to escape archers arrows (you'll almost always take the first hit, regardless), as well as making sure your ranged units don't attack enemies that can escape if they can't fire back. Then there's the fact that you can't just slip past an enemy; it's not impossible, but it'll take more turns. This means both you and the enemy can effectively block (or more accurately, slow down) units, protecting others. All of this forces you to think more strategically than the average SRPG. As you progress in the game, the AI will make more use of positioning, attempting to trap you, and the like.


There are surprisingly few gameplay videos online, and nothing that takes you completely through the game. The language barrier and lack of name recognition keeps Terra Phantastica squarely in the shadows. That situation is bound to change sooner or later, especially if this game is ever given a fan translation. Fortunately, I found one video that show the early scenes and first battles, and a second that explains the gameplay features (and even translates the main menu items) into English.



 
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cireza

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Here are some excellent screenshots of the gloriously stylish Terra Phantastica in action.
This is my most wanted translation on the console. A close second is Wachenroder (this game has an incredible atmosphere).
I have played this game a lot, even bought the Japanese Guide Book. Never made it to the end though, I feel like I am missing some important things sadly...

There are many choices, I believe they change how the young princess evolves. There are also some things hidden in battlefields that only some characters can see. And there are many different troops, and it gets a bit complicated without understanding all the stuff...

Absolutely gorgeous pixel-art. And the maps have different colors depending on which you visit first, and the time of the day. Wonderful !

Thanks for having talked about this game.
 
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Kazza

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More Sonic Z-Treme. The developer previously seemed to be done with the project, but has been putting in some work recently:



Again, I got audio delay with my capture equipment. While playing there is no delay, only in the output file for some reasons... It also interlaces the signal for no reasons... Download the game here : https://sonicfangameshq.com/forums/sh... Running on a real Saturn. The actual track included is Lost Boss from Sonic X-Treme, but as I run the game using my USB dev cart it's reading the disc in my Saturn (Hellslave), so the music here is Flesh Field.

He said it was being developed using the basic SGL rather than his own dev tools, hence the lack of transparency.
 
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DT MEDIA

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First Saturn community post of 2021!

Looks like the Grandia translation patch is now complete:



This is magnificent news. Grandia on Sega Saturn is a true labor of love that shines in every moment. If you're a fan of Hayao Miyazaki's adventures like Castle in the Sky, this will be your all-time favorite adventure-RPG. I really can't say enough great things about it.
 

InfiniteCombo

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Apologies if this has already been posted, but I like this video:


It's simply showing the animation differences between 3 versions of X-Men vs Street Fighter: the original CPS2 version, the Saturn version, and the PS1 version. And this being a Saturn thread, I can't emphasize the miracles that the 4MB cart allowed. This was the first instance that made that clear, and set up a string of amazing Capcom ports on Saturn (Vampire Savior, Street Fighter Zero 3, etc). (I say the first instance because the port of Marvel Super Heroes to the Saturn did use a "3MB" capability. But as much as I love the game itself, the Saturn port is terrible.)

Obviously the PS1 version is an embarrassment and shouldn't even factor into any equation. Even with removing the tag team aspect (a giant -- perhaps the major -- point of the game), you can see in the video the major frames of animation missing. It's choppy as hell.

The only somewhat major noticeable thing about the Saturn version is something that a lot of Capcom fighters/ports suffered from, a phenomenon I can only call "wide characters" (for lack of a better term). For most of the Capcom fighters, the Saturn versions had characters that seemed "wider" than their CPS1/CPS2 counterparts. Not sure what led to that, but honestly to me it's not that much of a distraction.
 
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Kazza

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I feel that someone is going to fix Doom one of these days, and it will be glorious. Probably a difficult job.

I would really like to the the beta version of the engine that was tailored to the Saturn hardware (before the dev was told by Cormack to stick closer to the PC version). That Hellslave FPS is looking really good, and may even surpass the likes of Quake and Exhumed in terms of technical achievement. If the level design holds up, then it could turn out to be a good game too.

Sega Saturn Shiro did a stream discussing these games (including some chats with the devs themselves). I'll take a listen tomorrow, if I get the time:

 

Kazza

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This is magnificent news. Grandia on Sega Saturn is a true labor of love that shines in every moment. If you're a fan of Hayao Miyazaki's adventures like Castle in the Sky, this will be your all-time favorite adventure-RPG. I really can't say enough great things about it.

I just started watching those classic animes on Netflix (never watched them as a kid). I'm finding them all really charming so far (watched the one about the pig pilot and the one with the big fluffy animal spirit who lives in a big tree).

From screenshots and clips, the whole aesthetic of Grandia looks like it holds up very well. It certainly looks better than Mystaria/Riglord (although that was a really fun game).
 
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