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Games NeoGAF Official SEGA SATURN Community

cireza

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Is our cartridge a particular brand? Where did you get it from? How much did it cost, roughly? I mean, I'm glad your cartridge works, but... a couple of helpful details wouldn't hurt, dude
Next time avoid being rude and I might be of some help, dude :messenger_tears_of_joy:
 
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InfiniteCombo

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Jan 26, 2014
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Next time avoid being rude and I might be of some help, dude :messenger_tears_of_joy:
I'll find out on my own. Thanks (for nothing...)

I wasn't trying to be rude, but I was frustrated that it was the 3rd time or so that I had been trying to get hardware related feedback/help in this thread, and got nothing. (And in general asking hardware related questions in this forum gets you... not very far.) Also, your answer came off as a bit of "works for me... sucks for you" which kind of rubbed me the wrong way.

So I'm gonna accept that this thread just seems to be about casual talk of Saturn games, and treat it as such.

I'll be posting pictures of one of my KoF '95 playthroughs sometime this week. Cheers!
 

cireza

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I wasn't trying to be rude
You basically entered the thread telling me that I was blatantly lying, while my intention to begin with was simply to share my experience with the cartridge I had just received to the community here.

Also, your answer came off as a bit of "works for me... sucks for you"
Well excuse me dude, but as you entered the thread basically stating that I was lying, I felt the necessity to confirm that it was working correctly. There was no implication such as "sucks for you". This only happened in your head.

So I'm gonna accept that this thread just seems to be about casual talk of Saturn games, and treat it as such.
And you are being rude again, dismissing the quality of the discussion we have here.

I'll find out on my own.
Have a nice search :messenger_winking:
 
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SpiceRacz

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Feb 27, 2017
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Hazuki Dojo




Sega Saturn 3D Showcase, Part Four

The fourth and final installment of my series at impressive 3D videogames for Sega Saturn is now published and online. Over 120 titles have been highlighted, which is a far greater number than I ever planned to write about. This was one of those topics where I thought I would cite a dozen examples, only to find the whole saga running away from me. The craziest thing is knowing that I could add still more games to the list. I could easily make a fifth episode if properly motivated, but I think four is more than enough.

Anyway, enjoy the final episode.

Never heard of Tennis Arena before, gonna try it out. Virtual Open Tennis was actually my first Saturn game and I played a ton of that. Tennis Arena looks considerably better, but like you mentioned, the bar for tennis games was pretty low (until Virtua Tennis).
 
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InfiniteCombo

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You basically entered the thread telling me that I was blatantly lying, while my intention to begin with was simply to share my experience with the cartridge I had just received to the community here.
Let's see my original statement, shall we?

I actually emailed a prominent dude on eBay that has sold a lot of these and is very knowledgeable; and, at least based on his response, the bolded is not quite true (unless you got a really fancy one, or one that I'm not aware of; that's entirely possible).

As you can see:
  1. I never called you a liar
  2. The bolded in my post was my acknowledgement that I didn't know which card you got, and that would've been your cue to say any number of things: (You saying to me): "Dude, stop talking to eBay amateurs" (LOL).... "Actually, I got [insert card here] and it seems to work fine".... "Yo InfiniteCombo, you're fake news, and here's why".... I'm being somewhat humorous but you get the point.

And yes, you're correct, I did talk about the quality of the discussion, out of frustration. But it's a measured frustration -- like I mentioned, I had reached out for help before in this very thread, but also:

- PC threads where requests for tips on getting graphics cards get ignored, only for people to come in gloating about "look at me! Got an RTX 3080!"
- Related to above, separate threads where people are bragging about selling their old graphics cards for high markups, when people on GAF itself have been asking around
- Any hardware related thread with somebody posting a problem, you get a lot of "works fine for me" drive by replies that are not altogether very helpful.
- Etc...

In my humble and relatively measured opinion, that seems like a lot of "fuck you, got mine" attitudes in a place that calls itself a community. So I think at some point I just got temporarily tired of those kinds of replies, and yours was the latest one in a string in such replies. (Setting aside if your reply was motivated by you thinking I came in acting like a dick, LOL).


Have a nice search :messenger_winking:
I certainly will. I'll run into someone who's actually... helpful? :messenger_winking:
That's a joke by the way... I can't help being a smart ass sometimes.

I tell you what, man. Enough with the thread derail. Despite how this exchange has gone, from your posts I've seen on the forum, I do dig your taste in video games and don't want this exchange to harbor any hard feelings. I can assure you there are none from my side, this whole time I haven't meant (and haven't taken) anything personally.

So let's shake (virtual) hands, have that metaphorical beer, and keep talking about awesome Saturn games. This thread is largely a one-man show from DT Media, so instead of getting into beef and dividing, let's work together to lift up this thread even more.

And lastly... I'm a hard headed proud motherfucker, so I'll put my pride aside for a second and say that I apologize if I "came at you." As I explained above, that wasn't my intention.

Cheers, man!
 

cireza

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I like this attitude.

Here is my experience so far with the Saturn. Not considering myself an expert, but I have 25 years of using this console. I had an Action Replay that I converted myself to Pseudo Saturn while doing a swap trick. Only did it once in my life, because I don't want to destroy my Saturn. I then bought the All in 1 Pseudo cart I am talking about.

From my experience in video-games overall, I would say that I do not know of any spotty carts. They work or they don't, but I don't remember having carts that would work or not based pure on randomness.
I know FOR SURE that the cartridge port of the Saturn is very spotty, and prone to failure. This is a very very common issue.
This problem is GREATLY enhanced by unofficial carts that we use a lot (like Action Replay) that have thicker, sometimes not beveled, PCB, and thus, push the connectors even deeper. After years of using Action Replay, good luck using official Memory or RAM carts : they will never get detected.

Even the Action Replay itself will become spotty. That's when you start playing with it a bit : insert it, boot, it is not detected. Move it a little in the port, boot. Still not detected. Move it again, boot : finally it is detected... but OH NO, all the saves that I had copied have disappeared ! This happens all the time. Probably the result of some pins not well detected and the Action Replay losing all its data for whatever reason.

My personal conclusion : Saturn cartridge port is a port where you should never remove the carts.

The one I have was bought on aliexpress. Search for Sega Saturn Pseudo, it is a black one with a switch on top. There are tons of it, can't tell you which one. It was a bit expensive, maybe 40$. I had to select the model that did everything by clicking on one of the pictures.

For now, it works and I am happy with it.
 
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DT MEDIA

GAF's Resident Saturn Omnibus
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The Sega Saturn community received a new notice from CWX, the person who has been undertaking an English translation of Princess Crown, the acclaimed Action-RPG from the same people who would go on to form indie darlings Vanillaware. He reports that personal issues have kept him very busy, but he is still very much interested in completing the project. This was the first word on the subject since December of 2019, and while the project remains on hiatus, it is good to hear from the translator and know he wishes to finish his work.

I was later informed directly by another source that the reasons for the ongoing delays stem from an ongoing legal battle over the estate of his late father, who passed away several years ago.

I bring this up because it is vitally important that we all recognize the enormous contributions provided by these individual programmers and translators who create fan translations of Japanese videogames. The fans who work on these projects do so entirely as a labor of love. Nobody ever gets paid or compensated in any way, and the completed patches are only distributed to a tiny number of people. If any given videogame translation is downloaded more than a couple hundred times, it is seen as a blockbuster smash hit. This is a tiny, tiny community of uber-diehard fans and amateur gaming historians.

The great thing about the homebrew videogame scene is that it's all being created for love, not money, not fame. Indeed, there are quite a few people who've had their knuckles slapped by copyright holders--we're specifically looking at you, Nintendo. Heaven knows there are far less stressful ways to spend your spare time. And so we should always applaud and offer our thanks for all the hard work from these individuals. We really should be paying them for what they do, even if it's just a couple bucks tossed into a Ko-Fi account.

While I do feel disappointed that Princess Crown will remain on hiatus for immediate future, I do remain hopeful that it will see completion. Perhaps other parties or translation teams could help out CWX or offer assistance? We certainly ought to point him in the direction of the SegaXtreme forums in any event, where many in the translation scene hang out.
 
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DT MEDIA

GAF's Resident Saturn Omnibus
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A big surprise announcement for Saturn fans: Bulk Slash is being given an English translation. This includes not only translating the Japanese text, but also includes newly-recorded voice tracks for the female copilots. Fantastic!

Here are the two relevant posts provided by the translation team to SegaXtreme, reprinted in their entirety. First, the initial post from March 31:

Announcing an English localization of Sega Saturn cult classic action game Bulk Slash!

Developed by CA Production and published by Hudson in 1997, Bulk Slash is one of the Saturn's best games, combining impressive 3D graphics with fast gameplay that allows the player to switch between a bipedal robot on the ground and a fighter jet in the air at will. But one of its most distinctive features is the ability to find navigators in each mission and bring them aboard your mech. They speak to you throughout each mission — giving directions to the next target, cheering on the player for destroying a swath of enemies, informing the player how many mission-critical objectives remain, even yelling out when the mech takes damage. Each of the seven navigators has different personalities and provide different gameplay benefits when they level up through repeated playthroughs.

But there's one problem for non-Japanese speakers: The navigators speak Japanese, and there are no on-screen subtitles for their lines.

Much of the game's on-screen text is already in English, from the in-mission user interface to the options screen to graphical elements on the stage select and mission briefings. This has allowed English speakers to get through the game without too much trouble, but none of the mission briefings or navigator introductions are in English, and a lot of the game's charm is lost without knowing what the navigators are saying during each mission — choosing one you like and hearing how her lines change as you level up your relationship is a big part of Bulk Slash's unique appeal. Besides, the ability to read each mission briefing in English greatly increases this game's accessibility, allowing English-speaking players to understand the situation — no more referring to an online FAQ to figure out what the hell you're supposed to do!

Greg, Mampfus and I have been working for the last month to make this game as accessible as possible to English speakers. Thanks to Mampfus, we have the ability to swap any in-game Japanese text with English fonts that I created, and we can swap any Japanese voice file for a new one from an English speaker. Thanks to Greg's translations, we've got all seven mission briefings in English, all seven M.I.S.S. navigators' introductions in English, and soon we'll have the controller configuration screen and the end credits changed over to English in game, too. Greg is still working on translating all of the in-game voice lines but he's got nearly half of them finished already.

But there's one thing we can't do on our own, and that's record voiceovers for all the navigators in the game. We need eight female (including the player's childhood friend) and one male (the player) volunteer voice actors to finish this localization project. Each navigator has about 100 lines, although many of them are very short — things like "behind us," "one remaining" and "target set." The player and his childhood friend have just a handful of lines of lines each.

There are also a number of smaller roles for the ending cutscenes, should we go forward with dubbing over those instead of simply adding subtitles to the Cinepak video files — a male narrator, a female child, several male children, etc.

So if you're a voice actor or you know one who would be willing to help, please let us know here on SegaXtreme or by emailing us at Bulk_Slash_translation@online.de — we'd love to hear from you! We also hang out on Sega Saturn Shiro's Discord server, and we can be reached out to on Twitter @lacquerleaks (Greg) and @Danbo_4 (me).

To be clear, this is an unfunded fan project and we're relying entirely on volunteers. But that also means it would be perfect for aspiring voice actors looking for more experience, or for voice actors who would love to help bring this awesome game to a wider audience.

Special thanks to Knight0fdragon for technical assistance to get us started with poking around the code, to Malenko for his suggestions with the on-screen English fonts, and to Ghaleon for providing editing assistance. We really appreciate the help they've given us. And thank you to Sega Saturn Shiro for bringing all of us together in the first place!

Secondly, here is the followup post from April 13:

OK, I suppose we're overdue for an update, so here goes. A lot has happened in the last two weeks!

We've gotten quite a few volunteers to lend their voices to the game and we're really excited about the applicants so far. We've had several men step forward to audition for Cress, the player character, but we're still looking for women to audition for the eight female characters in Bulk Slash. Well, seven — we've chosen an actress named Dark Mysty for Princess Metical and we hope to do a proper recording of all of her lines later this week. A few women have volunteered to audition for the other female parts and we'd love to hear from even more who might be interested.

We're still working on how to make voice clips sound as loud and clear as possible in the game, but Mampfus is finding that it does seem like recording at a frequency of 22050 hz in mono instead of stereo works best. He tried boosting the volume in post on some of Mysty's lines and our own test lines, and most of the lines seem pretty OK in-game. Sometimes they're a bit too quiet amidst all the sound effects, though.

A friend of Mampfus created a tool that makes it super easy replace in-game voice lines with new English ones as long as they're named the same thing and the English voice files aren't longer than the Japanese originals (which makes sense). It's going to really help us implement the voice acting quickly once we get rolling with the actors.

We're actually still working on the translations for the navigators' voice lines. Five of them are pretty much done, but Naira and Kina are still in progress. Our translator, Greg, is only one man! He's been working really hard to get through all the dialogue, though. After he finishes the voiced lines, he'll move on to transcribing and translating the eight ending cutscenes.

As for graphics, we implemented a translation of the controller setup screen. It uses the same set of fonts as the mission briefings during the game, so it was pretty simple for Mampfus to get this screen in shape.

Translating this screen was tougher than actually implementing the translation — there's not enough room in some of these spots for the words we originally wanted to use, like "transform" for the A button, or "turn left" and "turn right" for the D-pad functions (in Type C ... those functions are on the shoulder buttons in the Type A configuration). We thought about using "transf." but Greg wants to avoid abbreviations if at all possible. So we settled for saying "morph" instead of "transform. And we put "rotate" and "strafe" and didn't specify "left" and "right" since that should be pretty obvious anyway.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, the C button in robot mode says "jumpjet" instead of simply "jump" because it looked strange to have so much black space on screen for such a short word.

The other project for on-screen localization that we accomplished in the last two weeks was making edits to the Navigator Select screen. It's riddled with misspelled names — "Reone" instead of "Leone," "Meticul" instead of "Metical," "Lupia" instead of "Rupia" and "Coron" instead of "Colon." They're misspelled not only on the nameplates that you select on the left side of the screen but also in the biographical text on the right that appears when you highlight a character's name.
 
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celsowmbr

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Sega Saturn 3D Showcase, Part Four

The fourth and final installment of my series at impressive 3D videogames for Sega Saturn is now published and online. Over 120 titles have been highlighted, which is a far greater number than I ever planned to write about. This was one of those topics where I thought I would cite a dozen examples, only to find the whole saga running away from me. The craziest thing is knowing that I could add still more games to the list. I could easily make a fifth episode if properly motivated, but I think four is more than enough.

Anyway, enjoy the final episode.
final episode ????

noooooo please ! more ! more !
 

DT MEDIA

GAF's Resident Saturn Omnibus
Jan 7, 2018
882
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www.dtm-arts.com
If you kids want more articles by me, then it’s time to start paying. Which reminds me, I need to set up a Ko-Fi account.

I would like to write two more Saturn articles similar to the 3D series: one that shows off Sat-PSX games that are equally good, and another where the Saturn version is superior. Both lists are longer than you would think.

Short, Short Version: Saturn’s first year was kind of rough, but everything got better after that. Unfortunately, hardly anybody had bothered to look by that point.
 

DT MEDIA

GAF's Resident Saturn Omnibus
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www.dtm-arts.com






We're taking a fresh look at Magic Carpet on Sega Saturn, this time the Japanese release, which arrived nine months after the North American release in December 1996. This version makes a number of improvements, which is a very welcome surprise. Most notable is the inclusion of analog controller support. I've played for a while and I can faithfully report that the analog steering is a game changer. Movements are now subtle and graceful and circle strafing is far more effective than it was with purely digital controls. It's worth picking up the import just for this feature.

In addition, the JP edition fixes some of the graphical glitches from the Western release, particularly the polygon warping that occurs whenever you fly too close to any objects. I made sure to play both versions back to back to confirm this. Movement and frame rates appear to be slightly smoother, although this could be perception bias.

Finally, and this is a welcome addition for new players, a mission screen appears before each stage that lays out your objectives. This is very helpful, as Magic Carpet can feel a little strange and alienating for beginners. Unfortunately, all of this text is in Japanese, so if you don't read the language...well, it's the thought that counts. Perhaps we could find a translator somewhere to create an English language patch?

The overall experience is slightly more polished, which happens quite a lot with Saturn games. As a general rule, you'll want to get the later version as that may include bug fixes and tweaks. Examples include the US versions of Daytona USA, Tomb Raider and Steep Slope Sliders, and the JP version of Daytona USA Circuit Edition.

I've always loved Bullfrog's Magic Carpet and highly recommend it to all Saturn and Playstation owners, and especially those who can play the PC original. It strikes a very unique tone in the first-person shooter genre, mashing Doom with elements from Populous. Its pacing and battles feel more strategic and intelligent than simply blasting everything in sight. You have to have an actual battle plan and know your environment to succeed.

Again, if you're going to play this videogame, make it the Japanese Saturn edition. That's the definitive console take on the classic.
 

thiagosimoes

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Oct 10, 2013
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They published one game for the Playstation but it was in 2003 and it was some random Deformed Idol game. (I know it's not at the time, but it's pretty interesting to discover they did release something on a Competitors Console)

It's called MiniMoni: Shaker and Tambourine! Dapyon!



Just a random thing you'd like to see. :)

Yes, I remember playing this. It's like a poor man's Samba de Amigo, but it's still good enough to kill some time and have fun. The PS1 even got another game published by Sega: a reprint of Puyo Puyo Sun released in 2003.

In fact, Sega had involvement in a number of games for other systems, including the Super Famicom and Nintendo 64. It might sound crazy, but that's true. The SF received a port of Columns in 1999, and the N64 had Sega's name on the title screen of Puyo Puyon Party. In the late 90s, Sega also published a number of titles for the Game Boy and Game Boy Color.
 

thiagosimoes

Member
Oct 10, 2013
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Sega Saturn 3D Showcase, Part Four

The fourth and final installment of my series at impressive 3D videogames for Sega Saturn is now published and online. Over 120 titles have been highlighted, which is a far greater number than I ever planned to write about. This was one of those topics where I thought I would cite a dozen examples, only to find the whole saga running away from me. The craziest thing is knowing that I could add still more games to the list. I could easily make a fifth episode if properly motivated, but I think four is more than enough.

Anyway, enjoy the final episode.

Absolutely fantastic! I love the series! I'd love to see one more installment. You're missing Digital Dance Mix, D-Xhird and Fantastep, three of the best-looking games for the console, in my opinion. There are also other games that could be added, such as Final Fight Revenge, Layer Section II, Big Thanks Super Keirin, Mahoutsukai ni Naru Houhou, Nascar 98, Crime Wave, Elan Doree, F1 Challenge, Ninpen Manmaru, Jung Rhythm, Die Hard Trilogy, and even Hang On GP, Vatlva, DJ Wars and Densha de GO EX, if you're running out of options. I'd say even the bonus stages in Sonic 3D Blast are worth mentioning. Oh, and did you ever mention Radiant Silvergun, Virtual On and Thunder Force V? I really can't remember.
 
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DT MEDIA

GAF's Resident Saturn Omnibus
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Absolutely fantastic! I love the series! I'd love to see one more installment. You're missing Digital Dance Mix, D-Xhird and Fantastep, three of the best-looking games for the console, in my opinion. There are also other games that could be added, such as Final Fight Revenge, Layer Section II, Big Thanks Super Keirin, Mahoutsukai ni Naru Houhou, Nascar 98, Crime Wave, Elan Doree, F1 Challenge, Ninpen Manmaru, Jung Rhythm, Die Hard Trilogy, and even Hang On GP, Vatlva, DJ Wars and Densha de GO EX, if you're running out of options. I'd say even the bonus stages in Sonic 3D Blast are worth mentioning. Oh, and did you ever mention Radiant Silvergun, Virtual On and Thunder Force V? I really can't remember.


Yes, I could easily put together a fifth installment in the series, but I've made the case well enough. There is one fishing game that I have to edit into one of the articles, but I keep forgetting to do that. There's always more great looking 3D videogames on Saturn. I did have DJ Wars on my list but cut it out at the last minute in order to keep the final order around 120.

Did I forget to mention Radiant Silvergun and Thunder Force 5? Those are predominantly 2D videogames, so that's probably why. I might have to edit in Silvergun just for its own sake, as it's absolutely fantastic, but its visuals are 90 percent 2D. I definitely did mention Virtual On, that's a great one.