Orioto art thread - New VG wall every thursday!

orioto

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Well blackthornprod is about the most intuitive stuff I've seen in terms of tutorials, though if you're not familiar with code may have to pause for a bit.

Regards player controller here's an example of making one in unity, though you can also get premade ones that you simply attach to a character or object

That is the first of a 4 part series where that exact game shown is made, each episode about 10 min.

If you want to try very small simple games simply following along with some of these tutorials, will allow you to basically have an entire game after 30min-1hr minus the final polish(you don't need to know all the code nuance simply type it down, and put your assets, though many of these youtubers tell you what the code is doing as they go along). Of course most people would be missing the art. These simple games help you get familiar with the stuff for when you are going to handle more complex stuff.

While a coding language may seem intimidating the alternatives are not significantly easier, and if you later need to make more complex behavior it will help to have become familiar with such on simpler code as used in small apps.

There was a recent challenge of make a game in ten minutes from brackeys, and many youtubers created various games in ten minutes. Whilst of course that is testament of what experience and practice allows, some of them actually showed practically the entire process of creation, which could help someone less experienced make similar games with minor modifications following within said time frames. Though I'd suggest getting familiar with the environment prior to watching such, with a bit of experience these can be easily followed though with no experience it'd be a bit more of a challenge.

If you want deeper understanding of this type of code Sebastian Lague youtuber gets deeper into it, he's very good at explaining stuff(which goes from beginner to quite complex). Though you can get away without needing to know the nitty gritty.

Another technique that some developers seem to use is the combination of multiple premade assets(controls, music, graphics, etc) to produce games with minimal effort. I recommend unity because of the large asset store, if you want to do something, there may be assets that already do the thing and are plug and play

PS
I personally recommend unity, not only does it have an ample store, but it has very large number of youtubers as well as udemy courses covering different aspects of it. If you go to one guy and don't like his style of teaching there's another guy with a different style which may be more to your liking. Big community is always important, that large number of people teaching the basics as well as more advanced concepts combined with the more vibrant discussions online make it easier to clear doubts and grasp the engine.
Thx for all those links and explanation! I feel bad now lol, i'm a bit discouraged regarding all that.. the thing is, art is my thing, game design to, i love that, but coding or using any soft to dev i hate it. It's such a struggle, even if you find answers.. Those vids are discouraging me even more lol.
The thing is i really want to work with someone, it's actually a nice feeling! But it won't happen until i got enough money to hire one i guess.
 
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Thx for all those links and explanation! I feel bad now lol, i'm a bit discouraged regarding all that.. the thing is, art is my thing, game design to, i love that, but coding or using any soft to dev i hate it. It's such a struggle, even if you find answers.. Those vids are discouraging me even more lol.
The thing is i really want to work with someone, it's actually a nice feeling! But it won't happen until i got enough money to hire one i guess.
Well true, coding can seem a bit intimidating at first. But unless you are doing complex math things the reality is far simpler than it at first appears.

What I can say is that despite seeming intimidating, the biggest problem may be simple typos when dealing with such. Writing what you see onscreen will work even if you dont fully grasp why it is working.

In many cases very simple words are doing extraordinary things automatically. The reason they can and the exact way they work can elude you but that does not impede you from using them.

Coding is a bit like driving a car, there's a whole lot of machinery underneath but you dont have to be a mechanic to drive. Though you can get into the nitty gritty if you want to dive deep it is not necessary.

The basics of variables, loops, logic statements are at the core, I recommend everyone gets familiar with the basic concepts. It opens new ways of thinking and solving things.

I will say Ive been on your boat when it comes to some physics books. Some authors spring foreign math concepts out of the blue. Sure there's google fu, but I think providing recommended resources for prerequisites, and if possible explaining things in simple clear terms from simplest concepts somewhere in the apendix is good practice. It may be repetitious but wouldnt it be good if even the highest most complex books had within a roadmap guide to their concepts, covering things from the ground up, to refresh concepts and be beginner friendly without random google fu?

The problem is that there's a series of necessary preceding knowledge to understand certain topics. Whilst full grasp would require significant math, the truly necessary thing for unity is basic programming(unless using premade assets or code). I can tell you that a good basic programming book is far less intimidating than raw code, and does not take as much time as you'd think to read through. As for the math there's even some math whose exact workings may elude experienced programmers. Just know that some of the instructions, are like tools, they work you use them, but their inner workings can often be ignored.

Though again that would be if you get the time. But I highly recommend people get familiar with basic programming, infinitely easier and simpler to grasp in proper introductory books. Many of which are legally free on the internet.
 
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orioto

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Mar 10, 2005
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Well true, coding can seem a bit intimidating at first. But unless you are doing complex math things the reality is far simpler than it at first appears.

What I can say is that despite seeming intimidating, the biggest problem may be simple typos when dealing with such. Writing what you see onscreen will work even if you dont fully grasp why it is working.

In many cases very simple words are doing extraordinary things automatically. The reason they can and the exact way they work can elude you but that does not impede you from using them.

Coding is a bit like driving a car, there's a whole lot of machinery underneath but you dont have to be a mechanic to drive. Though you can get into the nitty gritty if you want to dive deep it is not necessary.

The basics of variables, loops, logic statements are at the core, I recommend everyone gets familiar with the basic concepts. It opens new ways of thinking and solving things.

I will say Ive been on your boat when it comes to some physics books. Some authors spring foreign math concepts out of the blue. Sure there's google fu, but I think providing recommended resources for prerequisites, and if possible explaining things in simple clear terms from simplest concepts somewhere in the apendix is good practice. It may be repetitious but wouldnt it be good if even the highest most complex books had within a roadmap guide to their concepts, covering things from the ground up, to refresh concepts and be beginner friendly without random google fu?

The problem is that there's a series of necessary preceding knowledge to understand certain topics. Whilst full grasp would require significant math, the truly necessary thing for unity is basic programming(unless using premade assets or code). I can tell you that a good basic programming book is far less intimidating than raw code, and does not take as much time as you'd think to read through. As for the math there's even some math whose exact workings may elude experienced programmers. Just know that some of the instructions, are like tools, they work you use them, but their inner workings can often be ignored.

Though again that would be if you get the time. But I highly recommend people get familiar with basic programming, infinitely easier and simpler to grasp in proper introductory books. Many of which are legally free on the internet.
Well some folks from here helped me with dev for an arkanoid style game, with unity, and even the basics like the ball physics ended being a big struggle for them, cause you always have specific problem to any type of game. Here being what do you do when the ball hit a corner, or get in a loop, or hit 2 blocks at the same time... Beyond programming and language, there is the joy of every little problem behind a concept! Its endless
 
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Well some folks from here helped me with dev for an arkanoid style game, with unity, and even the basics like the ball physics ended being a big struggle for them, cause you always have specific problem to any type of game. Here being what do you do when the ball hit a corner, or get in a loop, or hit 2 blocks at the same time... Beyond programming and language, there is the joy of every little problem behind a concept! Its endless
True. There can be problems even in things that should really be quite basic. Usually these kind of issues don't emerge if you're sticking to using the templates of existing game making tutorials and don't stray too far. But you miss the joy of discovery and problem solving doing so.

Working without guidance from the ground up even relatively easy things can f up, also the more innovative you want to get the likelier more issues will emerge implementing such, and the less likely there's a solution online.(googling can often solve many common issues).

As you say there are specific problems that emerge for specific new games, my tip for that is that given these are more time consuming and harder they should be done more sparingly. Cloning or reskins of existing game concepts with minor modifications(nothing too crazy), should have few problems(at least straight reskins should be practically problem free, given its of a game you've already made or one you've been taught how to make).
 
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orioto

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True. There can be problems even in things that should really be quite basic. Usually these kind of issues don't emerge if you're sticking to using the templates of existing game making tutorials and don't stray too far. But you miss the joy of discovery and problem solving doing so.

Working without guidance from the ground up even relatively easy things can f up, also the more innovative you want to get the likelier more issues will emerge implementing such, and the less likely there's a solution online.(googling can often solve many common issues).

As you say there are specific problems that emerge for specific new games, my tip for that is that given these are more time consuming and harder they should be done more sparingly. Cloning or reskins of existing game concepts with minor modifications(nothing too crazy), should have few problems(at least straight reskins should be practically problem free, given its of a game you've already made or one you've been taught how to make).
Yeah you're on point, and that's the problem, i have zero interest in doing existing games for the purpose of doing something, i will always have some sort of unique concept even if it's based on a basic genre, so i'm always stuck.
 
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Hey, wanted to shoutout to @orioto

Saw a big write-up about your art in the Playing With Power companion book for the SNES Classic. Congrats!

(also a great introductory book if the SNES Classic is a person's first experience with those titles).
I yes indeed, i knew about that, but i completely forgot about it, they didn't send me one!
 
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I yes indeed, i knew about that, but i completely forgot about it, they didn't send me one!
LAAAAAME.

Well, it was about 1/2 a page if not a full page, with several of your works displayed in full color. It was very nice to see that. Hopefully some curious readers will like your art and pay you a visit after reading that section.
 
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LAAAAAME.

Well, it was about 1/2 a page if not a full page, with several of your works displayed in full color. It was very nice to see that. Hopefully some curious readers will like your art and pay you a visit after reading that section.
I hope yeah, i don't know how for long has the book been out :p Thx anyway!