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PS4/Pro HDR + PSVR Verified Solutions

Jul 29, 2013
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Late last year Sony released their PSVR headset which has been in the making for years. At around the same time, they released PS4 firmware update 4.0, announcing that ALL PS4s now support HDR output(for games that are updated to support it). But anyone with a HDR capable TV who bought the PSVR instantly found a problem.

Problem: PSVR PU(breakout box) does not pass through HDR. It can handle 4K@60fps(w/ compressed color), but it does not support HDR! It seems Sony just skimped on this hardware. As a result, during HDMI handshake, the PU forces the PS4 down to HDMI v1.4, regardless of what your TV supports. HDMI 2.0 is required for HDR support, and also for Full uncompressed color(4:4:4) at 60fps. But it may not be such as trivial hardware change given the issues encountered trying to find a solution.

Of course, this isn't necessarily a huge problem for everyone as HDR software support is pretty thin at the moment(currently 15 titles + some media apps). While Pro Enhancements are required - HDR support is not a requirement and there are some notable Pro Enhanced games that lack it. Quite a few 4K TVs were sold before HDR standards were introduced - and so lack any support at all. Also, HDR standards are still new with inconsistent implementations across recent TV models, not to mention that HDR modes will typically introduce additional lag to a game, so it may or may not be worth solving depending on your TV and gaming preferences.
But support, both software and hardware, is improving all the time.
Anyone with a PS4Pro and 4KTV and PSVR however are losing color information(only compressed color(4:2:0) is supported at 4K@60 on HDMI 1.4) system wide.


Via the Official PSVR FAQ page Sony offered this:
If you have a HDR capable TV and want to view PS4 content in HDR, it is necessary to cable the PS4 directly to the TV.
ie. You have to unplug the HDMI cable going to the PU, and connect it directly to your TV. Depending on your setup, this may be easy, difficult or impossible and may eventually lead to damaged ports on one of these expensive devices.



A number of solutions have been tried across the initial 'problem discovery' thread and the official PSVR thread, with varying degrees of success. With new batches of hardware being released, there's new rounds of people questioning whether there's a solution.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Make sure you have good quality HDMI cables! And try to keep them, as short as possible for your setup. There are several reports of reports of solutions below not working, or causing image noise/sparkles, but it seems that cable quality plays a big part in the success of the following. For my part - I bought pretty cheap but short cables and haven't had issues, YMMV.


The Coupler:
This is one of the cheapest and technologically easiest solution that's being used.
Using female-to-female HDMI adapters to create additional, easier dis/connection points than getting behind your TV/PS4.
This requires extra HDMI cables


This is what I just did. Easiest way imho
Double face duck tape / coupler on the PSVR. Which I will just switch these 2 hdmi from the PSVR box to the coupler. Will take me 2sec max and no hassle with cables
As far as I can tell, this person is still disconnecting directly from the PU, but additional couplers could alleviate that.

Extension Cables
Like the Coupler solution, requires manually dis/connecting cables, but saves the ports on your TV & PS4 from wear.
Just wanted to add my solution. I brought two male to female hdmi extensions cables.
The green HDMI is connected in my PS4 Pro and when I want to play PSVR I just connect the green HDMI to the left HDMI like you see on the photo.

HDMI extension right on photo is PS4 Pro and is plugged in HDMI 1 in the television.
HDMI extension left on photo is PSVR and is plugged in HDMI 2 in the television.



HDMI Splitter/Switch:
Cable Hookup.
The idea here is simple, split the HDMI signal out of the PS4 in two, one cable going direct to your TV, the other going to the PU.
In practice it's not so simple. There are loads of splitters/switches out there not rated for 4K@60hz w/ HDR.



Switches:
I avoided this model due to conflicting information online. The offical Sewell website says it can do 4K@60, but on Amazon/Ebay I've seen explicit mention of 4K@30 only - and "May not work with PS4 PRO at 4k with HDR". If I bought this, I'd buy direct from Sewell direct.
To reiterate, this is the switch I purchased from Amazon, thanks to Ghost Lynx. Here's my full review:

The build quality on this switch is quite nice. It's built out of a very sturdy metal that is textured. It has a bit of weight to it, for being so small. In addition, the button has a good travel and click to it. The HDMI input/output ports are quite tight. More like snug. It took a bit more effort to plug in a cable than a normal HDMI port. This left me with confidence that the cables aren't going anywhere!

My only complaint is that it does not have any mounting holes in it. It is a solid box. I had to double up a zip-tie and wrap it around the box to mount it.


Last night I did some testing with Deus Ex: Mankind Divided. There's definitely going to be some option juggling if going from an HDR game to a non-HDR game (and back). As I mentioned above, the settings for HDR do need to be mucked with after switching. The odd thing about Deus Ex, however, was that it let me keep the HDR option on in the Video menu. I had to flick it on and off, depending on which source it was going to. However, the switch's main purpose, for me, is getting the HDTV back to HDR after playing a PS VR

I still feel the box is worth the money. It absolutely makes switching from the HDTV to the PS VR seamless, without worrying about wear-and-tear on the ports or having to constantly squeeze into a tight spot behind the media center.

For reference, here is my PS4 HDMI chain:

PlayStation 4 > Switch >
  1. Pioneer SC-95 AVR > Vizio P65-C1
  2. PS VR Breakout Box > Vizio P65-C1

In my experience, good quality cables are a must when introducing the switch into the HDMI chain between the PS VR unit and the Pro (although it's quoted below, testing on the Pro was successful with the below configuration).


Splitters:
Okay, here is my temp solution until something else comes along:

I added an HDMI splitter to my setup (one input, two output)

Setup as follows:

PS4 ---
...........|
...........IN_Splitter-OUT--------------TV HDMI 1
................................|
........................PSVR Box---------TV HDMI 2
................................|
............................PSVR

The drawback of this solution is that PSVR will disable HDR as discussed earlier in this thread, because the splitter "downgrades" the signal to the lowest common denominator.

HOWEVER, this happens only for as long as the PSVR box has power!

So if you just unplug the AC adapter of the PSVR box, or disable it in any other way, you can get your HDR signal on TV HDMI 1.

If you want to play VR, plug in the AC adapter (or flip a power switch if you install one) and go to TV HDMI 2, and it is good to go.

You have to plug/unplug something, and this solution takes 2 ports on your TV, but it works, for now.
Sure. I went all the way and made a full explanation picture. Hope this helps.

I'm currently using this model. As with Stike above, I need to disconnect power to the PU and the HDMI handshake allows HDR. In my setup this is much easier than messing with any HDMI cables as I have a power board with individual switches.
One issue I and another person found with this splitter was that after turning on the PU, the PS4 didn't recognise that the PSVR was connected. This is fixed by power cycling the splitter itself. I haven't seen similar issues reported with the splitter Stike uses.



Both the Splitter and Switch solutions above require the use of 2 HDMI ports on your TV/Receiver. There was a reddit post of someone using 2 of the Sewell Ibis Bi-Directional switches above, to split/recombine the HDMI connection. But I haven't seen confirmation of this actually working. and given the cabling issues inherent with introducing a switch, I'm not sure it would work without issue.


I will add further models if people report other successes.
 

KingHippo1967

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Jun 2, 2009
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This is a really helpful thread but I'm still annoyed it even had to exist in the first place. Stunning lack of foresight from Sony to not realise that two of its big future selling points - HDR and VR - would be incompatible.
 

HIGH DEF JEFF

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Jul 25, 2010
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Jul 29, 2013
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For a system that everyone claims to be plug and play, these looks pretty complicated to me.
This diagram is including power cables as well.
Sony actually made this product quite easy to setup with cables tagged with numbers that matched clear diagrammed instructions.

If the PU handled HDR - they'd have knocked it out of the park.
 

Caayn

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Mar 10, 2013
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If the PU handled HDR - they'd have knocked it out of the park.
Knocked it out of the park? They'd have done the least they could do considering they released HDR support just a months earlier.

The PU lacking proper HDMI 2.0 support is a mistake and should've been there day one. It lacks 4K60Hz with RGB / 4:4:4 chroma and lacks total HDR support due to that mistake.
 

SolidusDave

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Apr 14, 2009
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I really wish Sony wouldn't have half-assed /fucked up their hardware designs last year.

Just skip to the next iteration already and let me buy a PS4pro2 with a UHD drive and updated CPU that I can connect to PSVR without having to constantly unplug HDMI cables (ideally the PU should be already integrated anyway).
 
Apr 20, 2012
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Knocked it out of the park? They'd have done the least they could do considering they released HDR support just a months earlier.

The PU lacking proper HDMI 2.0 support is a mistake and should've been there day one. It lacks 4K60Hz with RGB / 4:4:4 chroma and lacks total HDR support due to that mistake.
Yeah I don't call basic cross functionality with something you're touting as the next big thing as "knocking it out the park" I'd call it normal. Sony dun goofed and I hope they rectify it somehow.
 

p_xavier

Formerly 'phil-x'
Jun 9, 2004
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I have the Ibis switch and I confirm that it works in 60hz with HDR with the right cables. The 3' monoprice certified monoprice cables did the trick.
 

Wollan

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1st generation VR is going to 1st generation. Combine that with the current shift to 4K & HDR and you have a big early-adopter stew cooking...

Will be more convenient when in 2020 we will be gaming on a PSVR2 (for PS5) with no wires and inside-out tracking (no external sensors), built-in earphones and much sharper images. And HDR/4K (and HDMI 2.1 variable framerates) having been properly landed.

With that said, all the challenges are worth it for playing Resident Evil 7 VR and a handful of others today.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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Yeah I don't call basic cross functionality with something you're touting as the next big thing as "knocking it out the park" I'd call it normal. Sony dun goofed and I hope they rectify it somehow.
"Knocking it out of the park" was in reference to the whole PSVR as a product, not specifically supporting that feature.

It really boggles the mind how one team could be implementing HDR system wide while another is choosing to rule it out entirely.
 
Apr 20, 2012
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"Knocking it out of the park" was in reference to the whole PSVR as a product, not specifically supporting that feature.

It really boggles the mind how one team could be implementing HDR system wide while another is choosing to rule it out entirely.
Ah fair enough and yeah it's just a comical error on Sonys behalf
 
Jun 2, 2013
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If Sony announced a new processor unit for PSVR that allows HDR passthrough, I'd take the hit and buy it. I wouldn't even complain about have to pay more money, as it will be way less messing about than having to swap cables all the time.
 

ViolentP

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Jan 13, 2009
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This is a really helpful thread but I'm still annoyed it even had to exist in the first place. Stunning lack of foresight from Sony to not realise that two of its big future selling points - HDR and VR - would be incompatible.
Agreed. I absolutely love my PSVR and it's a real shame they make it so difficult to use regularly.
 

DJ Lushious

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This is a much needed thread, with the multiple conversations occurring across different threads. Alas, it is also reopening old wounds. Haha!

I wanted to update you, OP, on some further discoveries on the Sewell switch that occurred after that initial post by me. In my experience, good quality cables are a must when introducing the switch into the HDMI chain between the PS VR unit and the Pro (although it's quoted below, testing on the Pro was successful with the below configuration).
It seems pretty clear that an 18Gbps HDMI cable (Certified Premium) is required, should a switch be introduced into the chain. And, this is a completely unsubstantiated claim, but I would hazard a guess a 24AWG HDMI cable would also do the trick, due to decreased signal resistance.

I could use some spare HDMI cables, as a general rule, so I am going to be ordering these from MonoPrice. Since they are Certified Premium, I suspect they will work exactly the same as Microsoft's/Vizio's cable. I'll update the thread when I get them in. I am also curious about the 24AWG theory, so I'm snagging this HDMI cable, as well.
Update on this! I received my MonoPrice cables in the mail today (see above). Here's my findings (all 3ft cables):


  • Certified Premium cables (CPC) to the switch, then CPC to the PS VR Processing unit yielded a perfect signal.
  • CPC to the switch, then Amazon Basics High Speed Cable (ABHSC) to the PS VR Processing unit yielded a perfect signal.
  • 24 AWG HDMI Cable to the switch, then CPC to the PS VR Processing unit yielded a perfect signal.
  • 24 AWG HDMI Cable to the switch, then Amazon Basics High Speed Cable[/URL] (ABHSC) to the PS VR Processing unit yielded a perfect signal.
The signal from the PlayStation 4* to the switch must be impeccable. The surefire way to accomplish this is with a Certified Premium Cable, which are rated and tested for 18 Gbps transmission. And since the 24 AWG cable offers such low impedance, it, too, is able to hit that same signal speed.

Conclusion? Use Certified Premium Cables, if introducing an HDMI switch. It's not a bad idea to adopt these cables, as a general, since the PS4 Pro is HDMI 2.0a and assuredly will utilize the full bandwidth of the pipeline. And that's not even mentioning that future HDMI 2.0a devices we'll start use as they become more commonplace.

*This pertains to the launch model of the PS4, as reported by .hacked. On Thursday we can do further testing with the PS4 Pro (I'm hyped)!

The only drawbacks are that 2 HDMI ports on the TV are taken and you still have to deactivate the PSVR breakout box in some way. Unplugging or turning it off, both works and stops the splitter from downgrading the signal, thus forwarding HDR to the TV.
It seems that there's no getting around this.

Thanks for relaying your results!

EDIT: Right, I remember the trouble with the switch, which caused those weird sparkle artifacts in VR. I have played some VR games with the splitter installed and there are no quality issues with the image at all.
That's certainly because the splitter is powered. Would you please relay what HDMI cables you use throughout your chain?


You have to plug/unplug something, and this solution takes 2 ports on your TV, but it works, for now.
That's the drawback of using a splitter as a solution. I believe the HDMI switch is the clear-cut best solution here. Once configured, it's the difference between pushing a button or mucking about with the devices in one way or another.

I'm hoping for a solution that limits swapping any HDMI leads at all, so if it means I lose one on the TV for this, I'm happy for it to happen, so that wouldnt bother me.
Thanks to everyone's work in this thread, we can, with the utmost confidence, say we do!

As GAFfers start to purchase said solutions, maybe we can cull together a master list of "tried-and-true" HDMI devices?
 

Jetman

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Jan 12, 2005
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Oh wow, thanks for the thread. Good looking out!

So, if I just unplug the power from my PSVR, that's not enough without the added splitter, right? If any of the PS4's signals are going through that PU, then I lose HDR?
 

dgco86

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Dec 8, 2012
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I'm using a coupler with (supposedly) high quality cables and 2 inputs on my AVR. While it mostly works, I do get signal dropouts once in a while at random intervals. It's extremely unpredictable though. There are days where I don't get a single drop and others where I get multiple drops in quick succession.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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Oh wow, thanks for the thread. Good looking out!

So, if I just unplug the power from my PSVR, that's not enough without the added splitter, right? If any of the PS4's signals are going through that PU, then I lose HDR?
The PU needs to be powered on, even just to pass through the signal from non-VR gaming.

When the PU establishes the connection to your PS4 - it tells the PS4 to send HDMI1.4 at most. HDMI 2.0 is needed for HDR. PS4 needs to not have a connection to PU in order to be free to make a HDMI2.0 connection.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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This is a much needed thread, with the multiple conversations occurring across different threads. Alas, it is also reopening old wounds. Haha!

I wanted to update you, OP, on some further discoveries on the Sewell switch that occurred after that initial post by me. In my experience, good quality cables are a must when introducing the switch into the HDMI chain between the PS VR unit and the Pro (although it's quoted below, testing on the Pro was successful with the below configuration).
Thanks DJ Lushious. I've updated OP with a direct link to your post, since nested quotes are a pain to copy.

Is your setup relatively easy, issue free now?

I know that some peoples setup wouldn't allow as simple power cycling of the PU/splitter as mine.
 

HideyoshiJP

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I might look at a good splitter solution, but I'm not sure HDR gaming is worth it yet for me. I bought a new receiver the Christmas before last before the new models with HDMI 2.0a had come out. At the time, I had no idea I'd be replacing my year-and-a-half old 1080p set.
Anyway, I'm not a fan of the audio lag I get using HDMI ARC (200ms+) vs going straight through the receiver (up to 100ms). For that reason, I'm probably only going to take advantage of HDR video and enjoy my PSVR without crazy cable setups.
 
Mar 15, 2014
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Useful thread, thanks.

I'm considering a Pro and this problem is one of the issues that's making me delay.

I think I can work around the need to shut down the PSVR processing unit to get HDR via the splitter: I use a lot of 433mhz remote control power sockets that I control from an open source home automation system. I think I can set up two PS4 activities on my Harmony Hub remote control, each using a different HDMI port on the TV, one switching the PU on and one leaving it off. Sounds like I need another remote socket to switch the splitter, too.

Hopefully I can get to a solution where no manual plugging or power switching is needed.
 

N1tr0sOx1d3

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Nov 28, 2014
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Well what a mess this seems to be. I really want PSVR but I'm not going mess around like this to get HDR/PSVR to work back and forth and I'm sure as hell not going to buy an additional splitter for something that absolutely should have been designed properly to begin with.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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Useful thread, thanks.

I'm considering a Pro and this problem is one of the issues that's making me delay.

I think I can work around the need to shut down the PSVR processing unit to get HDR via the splitter: I use a lot of 433mhz remote control power sockets that I control from an open source home automation system. I think I can set up two PS4 activities on my Harmony Hub remote control, each using a different HDMI port on the TV, one switching the PU on and one leaving it off. Sounds like I need another remote socket to switch the splitter, too.

Hopefully I can get to a solution where no manual plugging or power switching is needed.
The issue with splitters and the PU is that all connections are active - because the PU is always powered on. Thus the TV uses the lower spec'd HDMI connection. Can you control the power outlet via your Harmony Remote?

If not,what I think you probably want is a HDMI Switch, with IR remote that you can clone the signal for. A Switch should terminate all but the selected HDMI connection - preventing the TV lowering to HDMI1.4. I've seen HDMI2.0/HDR Switches with remotes on Ebay, but they are more expensive than the Sewell Ibis, and I've not seen anyone test one out yet.
But with a Harmony Remote, it should work out to be a good solution. Hope it works out, and let us know.

Well what a mess this seems to be. I really want PSVR but I'm not going mess around like this to get HDR/PSVR to work back and forth and I'm sure as hell not going to buy an additional splitter for something that absolutely should have been designed properly to begin with.
It's dumb that this problem exists, but for people who've bought a PS4, PSVR, 4KHDR TV, and some of the compatible software, getting indignant about spending ~$20 on a switch/splitter to make full/proper use out of all that kit is a bit dumb too.
The thing is - ignoring everything above, switching from standard gaming to VR gaming is a big process for pretty much everyone. I keep my headset in it's box to avoid dust on the lens, so I have to connect the headset cables. I roll my swivel char from my desk to the middle of my lounge area. I have to connect my headphones to the PSVR. Flipping a switch on the powerboard right next to where my headset is stored is no trouble at all. Switching cables as directed by Sony is a completely different story though.
 
Mar 15, 2014
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The issue with splitters and the PU is that all connections are active - because the PU is always powered on. Thus the TV uses the lower spec'd HDMI connection. Can you control the power outlet via your Harmony Remote?
Yes, via a convoluted hack: Harmony supports Hue lights (I don't have any; too expensive for me). Free open source software Home Assistant can emulate the Hue bridge and link to any number of arbitrary switches. I use Pilight and a cheap Chinese 433mhz transmitter to trigger the power outlet switches.

The same hack lets me switch anything using an Amazon Echo Dot; Alexa thinks it's talking to a Hue API, but it can trigger any IoT device.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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Yes, via a convoluted hack: Harmony supports Hue lights (I don't have any; too expensive for me). Free open source software Home Assistant can emulate the Hue bridge and link to any number of arbitrary switches. I use Pilight and a cheap Chinese 433mhz transmitter to trigger the power outlet switches.

The same hack lets me switch anything using an Amazon Echo Dot; Alexa thinks it's talking to a Hue API, but it can trigger any IoT device.
Cool. Sounds like you've got a pretty complicated setup already , so I doubt you'll have any problems getting it going. Your Hamony setup sounds pretty nice.

Can confirm this Fosmon switch did not work for me despite some people saying it would:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LFX1UDM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
What exactly was the issue with this model? Did HDR not work when connected? or were there graphical glitches introduced?

Keep in mind that some people did have graphical issues in VR with the Sewell switch, but by trying different/better cables were able to fix it.
 

MrCaliaztec

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Nov 4, 2014
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I'm trying the coupler method just because I don't mind unplugging the 2 cables from the PU and having them connected.

With that said I am starting to worry about the few extra HDMI cables I ordered. I have a Samsung KS8000 and I purchased a few of these HDMI cords from Monoprice and am worried about the 10.2gbps bandwidth I've been reading that the 18gbps is needed for 4K and HDR. But the cables that I've used that came with the PS4 and PSVR I've read are 10.2gbps and I've been using those for 4K and HDR so should I be worried?

I bought these HDMI cords
https://www.monoprice.com/mobile/product/details/13766?maincategoryid=102&categoryid=10240&subcategoryid=1024020&cpncd=

And this Coupler
https://www.monoprice.com/mobile/product/details/2781?maincategoryid=104&categoryid=10419&subcategoryid=1041907

I didn't see any couplers that are "4K ready" so hoping I'll be ok here, but heard varying reports of issues of the HDMI are not a high enough bandwidth or too long. I tend to always buy 6ft. So any insight and advice here would be greatly appreciated!

Edit: reading a bunch of forums posts is the 18gbps a must mostly for Switch and splitter issue? Or is the coupler method just the ugly duckling of choices and not many do it?
 

Pejo

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Jul 1, 2009
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I'm keeping my eye on this and the other thread about this topic. Still waiting until someone has a fool-proof method to do this, even if it's just a specific coupler that works 100% with no digital noise or issues.

I wish that Sony would throw us a bone here and at least offer a real solution or a guide. Even if they have to make a coupler that 100% works.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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With that said I am starting to worry about the few extra HDMI cables I ordered. I have a Samsung KS8000 and I purchased a few of these HDMI cords from Monoprice and am worried about the 10.2gbps bandwidth I've been reading that the 18gbps is needed for 4K and HDR. But the cables that I've used that came with the PS4 and PSVR I've read are 10.2gbps and I've been using those for 4K and HDR so should I be worried?
I haven't seen anyone having any issues with coupler. Although, in general you probably want the best/shortest cables you have for the 4K/HDR connection.

You shouldn't need to spend a lot on cables, maybe just swap around your existing cables if you have issues. I had to buy cables for my splitter because I didn't have enough, but I think my cables were unbranded and $2-3 each, but they were short, 1m(3ft).

I'm keeping my eye on this and the other thread about this topic. Still waiting until someone has a fool-proof method to do this, even if it's just a specific coupler that works 100% with no digital noise or issues.

I wish that Sony would throw us a bone here and at least offer a real solution or a guide. Even if they have to make a coupler that 100% works.
The purpose of this thread is to provide only solutions that have been verified to work. The only question is whether your existing cables will be sufficient.
Also, not every solution works for everyones setup, with cable positions, TV units, etc.
 

MrCaliaztec

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Nov 4, 2014
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I haven't seen anyone having any issues with coupler. Although, in general you probably want the best/shortest cables you have for the 4K/HDR connection.

You shouldn't need to spend a lot on cables, maybe just swap around your existing cables if you have issues. I had to buy cables for my splitter because I didn't have enough, but I think my cables were unbranded and $2-3 each, but they were short, 1m(3ft).
Awesome some piece of mind is definately appreciated. Even though I bought 4 of those 10.2gbps HDMI cables for $3 buck each they are 6ft. Noticed Amazon Basics had a 2 pack of 3ft ones that were marked as 18gbps so at the very least I'll use those for my coupler since shorter and high speed. And I'll just use those other 4 as back up and might as well put fresh ones on my WiiU and Xbox One S, figure I'll make sure it has a decent HDMI for the HDR as well.
 

HitCtrlAltDel

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Jan 16, 2012
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OP, please correct your post to not say the break out box supports 4K@60hz. While it does sort of, the truth of the matter is that it does this through 4:2:0 color compression. Simplified that means that you get a true 4K luminance resolution with a 1080p color resolution applied. I do not consider this 4K and neither should you. It looks no where near as good as a true 4K@60, 4:4:4 signal. Only HDMI 2.0 can do an uncompressed 4K transmission which is why the HDMI 1.4 breakout box cannot do it.

For more information on chroma subsampling go here.

EDIT: BTW, the solutions in this thread not only will enable HDR, but will also allow an uncompressed, 4K/60/4:4:4 signal to reach your TV if that wasn't clear. So these solutions should be used with anyone with a PS4 Pro, 4K TV and PSVR setup, not just for those looking for HDR.
 
Jul 29, 2013
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OP, please correct your post to not say the break out box supports 4K@60hz. While it does sort of, the truth of the matter is that it does this through 4:2:0 color compression. Simplified that means that you get a true 4K luminance resolution with a 1080p color resolution applied. I do not consider this 4K and neither should you. It looks no where near as good as a true 4K@60, 4:4:4 signal. Only HDMI 2.0 can do an uncompressed 4K transmission which is why the HDMI 1.4 breakout box cannot do it.
Thanks.
I've updated the OP to detail the loss of color(@4k/60) as well as the omission of HDR from HDMI 1.4 connections.
I'm not going to go so far as to say it doesn't support 4K, since it does pass through a 4K signal, albeit a compromised one.
 

whatwhatster

Neo Member
Nov 23, 2016
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This solution is what I did back in november and still working great :)).


Just wanted to add my solution. I brought two male to female hdmi extensions cables.

The green HDMI is connected in my PS4 Pro and when I want to play PSVR I just connect the green HDMI to the left HDMI like you see on the photo.



HDMI extension right on photo is PS4 Pro and is plugged in HDMI 1 in the television.
HDMI extension left on photo is PSVR and is plugged in HDMI 2 in the television.



So this way it is just one handling if I want to play PSVR :).








Extension cable is on below,

https://www.amazon.co.uk/KabelDirekt-Extension-compatible-Highspeed-Ethernet/dp/B013ICMXU6/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1488239196&sr=8-2&keywords=hdmi+hdr+extension+cable
 

Grinchy

Gold Member
Aug 3, 2010
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a cave outside of Whoville.
I just feel like the extension cable is the easiest and most reliable cheap route at the moment.

You plug an extension cable into the back of your PS4. Then you're only swapping a single HDMI cable at any time on the other end of the extension cable, so you don't have to reach behind anything and there's no concern of a port being overused.

On your TV you just need to have 2 HDMI slots. You use one for HDR and one for VR.
 

Cyriades

Member
Jun 14, 2006
1,319
0
0
Well then I will have to buy this.

Sony should offer a replacement program for their breakout box.
I just bought one. I rather press a button then swapping cables. No doubt this would end up damaging the HDMI ports.
 

ghibli99

Member
Jul 23, 2005
13,586
1
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The "cons" listed in that single review on the Sewell switch... sound kind of annoying.