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Samsung monitor: rename HDMI input to PC... wait, what?

Leonsito

Member
Apr 28, 2005
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Asturias, Spain
Thanks for all the replies.

I've been working on the TV calibration today, it seems like there are two options:

-Renaming HDMI input to PC, and setting contrast, brightness and gamma, Game Mode is OFF and you can't turn it ON.

-Using HDMI with "Screen Fit", setting Game Mode ON and having a lot more options to calibrating the TV (setting sharpness to 0 and all that too).

After a couple of tests from some calibrations videos from the AVS forums I choose the first option. I have a lot less options to use, but the image is softer, after calibrating brightness and contrast it looks pretty good, colors have a less more "in your face" effect, the text in the Xbox menus is more clean, and the jaggies have been greatly reduced.

I'm pretty happy right now, I think I have achieved a pretty good result (but I know that sooner or later I will try the other options to see if I can achieve something better lol).
 

Red Dolphin

Member
Jun 10, 2004
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How does this work if you plug everything via HDMI into a receiver first and then a single HDMI to the TV? Or does it not apply here?

I did notice that when I plugged my TV in via HDMI into the receiver I needed to set it to "screen fit" but it still looked "off" somehow. The sharpness probably was too high.
 

Theonik

Member
Aug 14, 2010
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kininarima.su
I haven't experienced anything like this before. This sounds like the most convoluted unintuitive way to set PC mode/disable overscan ever. Why would they implement it like that?
 
Red Dolphin said:
How does this work if you plug everything via HDMI into a receiver first and then a single HDMI to the TV? Or does it not apply here?

I did notice that when I plugged my TV in via HDMI into the receiver I needed to set it to "screen fit" but it still looked "off" somehow. The sharpness probably was too high.
I've been trying to look for a new tv and settled on a samsung (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824001392). Very glad I remembered this thread.

Anyway, from what I've been reading it should work the same. It's probably unlikely that your receiver is doing anything weird as the tv should be treating the signal the same way by disabling overscan and other various filters if you rename the input to PC. Try fiddling with the sharpness or some other settings, or just check online to see if your particular tv has some sort of popular calibration settings.
 

kinggroin

Banned
Sep 4, 2006
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SuperÑ said:
Also, turning the "SHARPNESS" value down to 0 improves the image quality vastly.

No. This is poor advice, though I understand why you (and many others) say this.

On many digital sets, a 1:1 pixel setup will usually have the internal bias set as such, that sharpness set as 0 will offer a pure image without any kind of artifacting.

Many, not all.

Its best to educate the tv owner on what to look for when sharpness is set higher than base internal bias setting. A single click over this value (which could be "0" on one set, but "50" on another), will introduce white artifacts on edges where there is contrast (look at black lines against lighter backgrounds). The farther you go over this base value, the harsher this artificial contrast becomes.

Now if one's goal is to obtain a calibrated picture that's as close to the source as possible, you want the sharpness to be set at the point where this white outlining or halo-ing vanishes from edges. If you dont care about accuracy and simply want the illusion of a sharper image, then by all means, adjust this option to a suitable level relative to the seating distance.