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Capcom to announce a big title for PS4 at E3, possibly Resident Evil

Neff

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Feb 6, 2012
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6 just kept crashing on 360, was a complete turd.
I've finished the 360 version of RE6 with every character about 20 times or so since release day without one crash, so I don't know what's going on with your console.

I do wonder if, when people talk about RE6, they're actually talking about Operation Raccoon City. It would explain a lot.
 

DVCY201

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I would argue your options and the enemies mesh together surprisingly well (the cover system being the only outlier, though it can be safely ignored 99% of the time). You're actions have a way of flowing into each other naturally, the game has decent punishes for failing to use them, and you have a lot of enemies with different strengths and weaknesses. It's not a perfect set of puzzle pieces, but no TPS (or 3D Action game) is.

In what way doesn't it mesh (that you could also say isn't true for, say, Resident Evil 5, for the sake of making one's point clear)?
I agree with you. I'm not arguing mechanics, so much so as pacing. They're needed to be more scenarios to emphasize the mechanics of the game, which are great. Mercenaries has never been more fun, and that in part due to the design of the maps married with the mechanics.

The campaign however, has this mix of open spaces and constricted design. It's satisfying dodging, rolling, and sliding past Ustanak as Jake, but then the game forces me into narrow corridors in a weird stealth section. Same problem with Leon too. I'm stuck in mine carts, an airplane, and a train, where the mechanics never shine. The game needed more ways to really push the player to utilize these mechanics, which is why the bosses are disappointing. Fighting Deborah at the bottom of the catacomb? Awesome. Fighting Deborah in a minecart? Ehh... 2-3 Ogroman are here? Oh, I guess I just shoot them in the pulsating heart protruding from their back. Yawn 2.0?! It just keeps appearing and then disappearing, and then I kill it using the power of electricity.

Just the overall design, and some odd choices to stitch it together harm the overall game for me. The vehicle sections don't add anything to enhance the mechanics, nor does the stealth. It's just another point on the checklist. Also, the stamina bar is so-so.

RE5 has the benefit of parroting RE4's design, and even enemies. It borrows the mechanics and has cohesive campaign pacing. Moving from the town to the harbour to the marshlands, etc. felt natural oddly enough. RE6 I went from a city, to an underground lab, and then random catacombs, only to suddenly start the next mission on a plane. I don't know how I got on the plane, but I am. If you took the mechanics of RE6 and put them in it, I'd say that RE5 would trump RE6. RE5 has a slow buildup, much like RE4. But with RE6, it felt that every scenario had to be more exciting than the last. Also, I hated running from that bloody tank in the mansion.
 

Jawmuncher

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I really don't think it'll be RE7. Why would you say as much and ruin the surprise?
Can't think of capcom ever just coming out and saying what we'll see when it comes to the mainline game at an event where the game hasn't been officially revealed.

Really think this RE comment is getting mixed in with whatever their E3 announcement is.
 
Mar 9, 2006
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I really don't think it'll be RE7. Why would you say as much and ruin the surprise?
Can't think of capcom ever just coming out and saying what we'll see when it comes to the mainline game at an event where the game hasn't been officially revealed.

Really think this RE comment is getting mixed in with whatever their E3 announcement is.
They're in the same paragraph. They don't specifically say anything about 7 other than they're gonna follow up with it since 6 did so well.
 

Pepsiman

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I think some greater clarification needs to be provided about what the Sankei article was actually discussing. The substance of the piece wasn't really about a potential Resident Evil 7 per se; Sankei was mostly asserting Capcom could announce it at E3 in an attempt to make up for losses incurred in mobile development and other problem areas. It's actually a pretty interesting piece all around about what sort of place Capcom is in financially and the predicament it's arguably finding itself in as result of not having hit smart phone games compliment their success with Monster Hunter, but the most pertinent bits are in the last two sections, which I already translated for Giant Bomb and will repost below. [EDIT: Per a friendly request and my own general desire to see things through to the end, I've gone ahead and translated the rest of its article so you can read it in its entirety.]

Could a Capcom Revival be coming at long last by way of a new Resident Evil? (by Naoki Fujiwara, April 19, 2014, 12:00.)

Having been preoccupied by the success of Monster Hunter 4 for the Nintendo 3DS portable gaming system, prominent game developer Capcom is significantly lagging behind when it comes to having a majorly profitable smartphone game to call its own. The company not only reduced its earning forcast for the fiscal quarter ending March 26 to the tune of 5 billion yen [approximately $50 million USD] in the wake of a game development cancellation, but it also has yet to put out any major software for the PlayStation 4 console, which has been received well in Western territories. Unless Capcom learns to stop depending so much on its Monster Hunter franchise, it could well find itself in a bind down the road.

Is Capcom's pride making itself an enemy of smartphone games?

Having become a household name by way of games such as the Resident Evil series, Capcom as a game developer is one of the major representatives of the Japanese video game industry, putting out a number of games that are tailored primarily towards hardcore gamers, people who fervently play video games. Save for Nintendo, with most other Japanese video game companies being left behind by their more technologically advanced counterparts in the West, Capcom has become a bit of a lone wolf, in turn shouldering a lot of gamers' hopes and expectations as it goes about its business.

In contrast to traditional games, smartphone games routinely target more "casual" players, with qualitative emphasis on the development side focusing less on a game's craftsmanship and more on its monetization schemes and how to make money from its players. Many gamers in the traditional sense therefore tend to distance themselves from smartphone games. As a result of Capcom's insistence on its games having that high quality craftsmanship, its knowledge about how to go about developing for smartphones is lacking and is a key factor behind its lateness in producing a major hit for them.

Effectively, given the sort of experience that the company's developers have accrued up until now, Capcom's management has made it clear that they won't take a serious transition into smartphone game development lightly and that doing so would be a blow to their pride. Although game development costs for smartphones are normally curtailed in favor of raising profits, Capcom's smartphone games have cost them a lot of money and have in turn resulted in a duds. Specific titles haven't been mentioned by the company, but Monster Hunter: Massive Hunting, which was released in February last year and stopped service in late March, is seen to be an especially major culprit when it comes to its mobile doldrums.

As a result of these factors, Capcom posted its 5 billion yen losses on March 31 for its quarterly earning report. This therefore has brought down its projected operating profits down by 2 billion yen to a total of 10 billion yen [approximately $100 million USD], with overall profits being reduced by 3.5 billion yen to a total of 3.3 billion yen [approximately $33 million USD].

Nevertheless, sales figures for Monster Hunter 4 far exceeded the company's projections, resulting in Capcom getting an extra 4.5 billion yen over its initial expectations for company-wide sales, upping the final number to 101.5 billion yen [approximately $1 billion USD] and marking the first time the company has crossed the 100 billion yen threshold. For better or for worse, Capcom has increasingly hedged its bets on the success of its Monster Hunter franchise.

What made Capcom go with the Xbox One over the PS4 for a big retail game?

Capcom's problems aren't limited to its prospects with smartphone games, however. They were also late to start developing a major game for the PlayStation 4, which has been a huge hit so far in Western countries and has a lot of passionate gamers supporting it.

As of this writing, the only thing Capcom has on the table for the PS4 is a downloadable title, Deep Down, with nothing bigger in the pipeline that could satiate fan expectations. What's more, Deep Down, which doesn't have a set release date, is also only going to be a free-to-play game.

Capcom president Haruhiro Tsujimoto asserted that "Free to play games are the norm for smartphones, but there are instances where they've also succeeded on consoles, so we see it as a challenge worth taking upon ourselves." The company has faith that it'll put out a reputable game, but its monetization scheme could ultimately make or break it in the eyes of its fans.

Meanwhile, on the Xbox One, the PS4's rival console made by Microsoft, Capcom has already put out a million-selling hit, but that console won't be coming to Japan until September. This has left Japanese gamers feeling left out in the cold while they're left waiting for a big new console game to play of their own. On top of that, sales of the Xbox One hardware are trailing behind that of the PS4, putting Capcom in a bind; even if it made a tactical error in focusing on developing for the Xbox One, they're too fargone to take it back at this stage.

Could Capcom be planning something for E3 in June?

With Capcom late to the smartphone game development scene and dissatisfaction surrounding its current PS4 output, one could argue that the developer has seen better days. Nevertheless, plans are being put into action to turn the situation around.

On the smartphone front, for instance, Capcom up until now developed for them at both its main headquarters in Osaka as well as its branch office in Tokyo. But from this April onwards, those efforts will be consolidated as part of the company's online PC game development team in Tokyo. With monetization of online PC games greatly resembling those of smartphone games, Capcom hopes that the move will yield a lot of synergized efforts going forward.

And then there's the matter of E3. Set for June, the publisher plans to show off a major game of some sort for the PS4. Fans are getting increasingly hyped up for the event, as they take it to mean that a new Resident Evil game is on the horizon. Resident Evil 6, the last game in the series, sold over 5.6 million units and it's expected that a potential 7 would sell equally as well if such a thing were to come out.

For the time being, Capcom has Monster Hunter 4G set to arrive in stores this fall as a revamped version of Monster Hunter 4, but an analyst familiar with the game industry expressed restraint about its potential success, stating "I feel confident in saying that Monster Hunter is going to prove to be less and less of a golden egg compared to its highs for the 2007-2008 fiscal year [This is when the portable iterations of Monster Hunter 2 were running amok on Japanese sales charts]. Obviously they need to make a splash on smartphones, but they also need something else that's big as a traditional game or else Capcom could find itself left behind by speedier Western game developers." To say the least, Capcom is definitely at a crossroads at this stage.
I'm not trying to put this out there as if to say I don't personally expect an RE game to show up at E3. Could it? Sure, I wouldn't be super surprised. I just think the importance of that as a point in the article is being overemphasized relative to what's actually being discussed. If people are interested in seeing the first parts translated, too, just to get the whole picture, I can probably whip something up in a jiffy, but none of it is really related to what this thread is talking about at least.
 

gigantor21

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I'm not trying to put this out there as if to say I don't personally expect an RE game to show up at E3. Could it? Sure, I wouldn't be super surprised. I just think the importance of that as a point in the article is being overemphasized relative to what's actually being discussed. If people are interested in seeing the first parts translated, too, just to get the whole picture, I can probably whip something up in a jiffy, but none of it is really related to what this thread is talking about at least.
I'd love to see more, absolutely. Thanks for the great translation. :)

But yeah, Capcom has a LOT to prove in the coming months. They left this generation weaker financially and in terms of reputation, and their attempts to make up the difference in mobile haven't done much. Hopefully they can turn things around.
 

Jawmuncher

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I think some greater clarification needs to be provided about what the Sankei article was actually discussing. The substance of the piece wasn't really about a potential Resident Evil 7 per se; Sankei was mostly asserting Capcom could announce it at E3 in an attempt to make up for losses incurred in mobile development and other problem areas. It's actually a pretty interesting piece all around about what sort of place Capcom is in financially and the predicament it's arguably finding itself in as result of not having hit smart phone games compliment their success with Monster Hunter, but the most pertinent bits are in the last two sections, which I already translated for Giant Bomb and will repost below.



I'm not trying to put this out there as if to say I don't personally expect an RE game to show up at E3. Could it? Sure, I wouldn't be super surprised. I just think the importance of that as a point in the article is being overemphasized relative to what's actually being discussed. If people are interested in seeing the first parts translated, too, just to get the whole picture, I can probably whip something up in a jiffy, but none of it is really related to what this thread is talking about at least.
They're in the same paragraph. They don't specifically say anything about 7 other than they're gonna follow up with it since 6 did so well.
Ahhh ok thanks you two for the clarification. I figured it was more a talk about finances and the sort, and what could help them more so than anything else.
 

Hoo-doo

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Sep 29, 2011
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Having only just recently experienced Dragon's Dogma through the magic of PS+, I can't wait for the sequel.

It gives me RPG vibes I haven't experienced in ages. It's so good.
 

Pepsiman

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I'd love to see more, absolutely. Thanks for the great translation. :)

But yeah, Capcom has a LOT to prove in the coming months. They left this generation weaker financially and in terms of reputation, and their attempts to make up the difference in mobile haven't done much. Hopefully they can turn things around.
Ask and ye shall receive! I edited my original post to include the entire article now, but here's my translation of the introduction specifically. I don't normally do business translation, so the terminology for some of those last bits might not be overtly formal in spots, but the core information should otherwise be correct. I made sure to double check with some other independent research just to make sure I was on the right page, at least. Anyway, here's the first part of the article below:

Could a Capcom Revival be coming at long last by way of a new Resident Evil? (by Naoki Fujiwara, April 19, 2014, 12:00.)

Having been preoccupied by the success of Monster Hunter 4 for the Nintendo 3DS portable gaming system, prominent game developer Capcom is significantly lagging behind when it comes to having a majorly profitable smartphone game to call its own. The company not only reduced its earning forcast for the fiscal quarter ending March 26 to the tune of 5 billion yen [approximately $50 million USD] in the wake of a game development cancellation, but it also has yet to put out any major software for the PlayStation 4 console, which has been received well in Western territories. Unless Capcom learns to stop depending so much on its Monster Hunter franchise, it could well find itself in a bind down the road.

Is Capcom's pride making itself an enemy of smartphone games?

Having become a household name by way of games such as the Resident Evil series, Capcom as a game developer is one of the major representatives of the Japanese video game industry, putting out a number of games that are tailored primarily towards hardcore gamers, people who fervently play video games. Save for Nintendo, with most other Japanese video game companies being left behind by their more technologically advanced counterparts in the West, Capcom has become a bit of a lone wolf, in turn shouldering a lot of gamers' hopes and expectations as it goes about its business.

In contrast to traditional games, smartphone games routinely target more "casual" players, with qualitative emphasis on the development side focusing less on a game's craftsmanship and more on its monetization schemes and how to make money from its players. Many gamers in the traditional sense therefore tend to distance themselves from smartphone games. As a result of Capcom's insistence on its games having that high quality craftsmanship, its knowledge about how to go about developing for smartphones is lacking and is a key factor behind its lateness in producing a major hit for them.

Effectively, given the sort of experience that the company's developers have accrued up until now, Capcom's management has made it clear that they won't take a serious transition into smartphone game development lightly and that doing so would be a blow to their pride. Although game development costs for smartphones are normally curtailed in favor of raising profits, Capcom's smartphone games have cost them a lot of money and have in turn resulted in a duds. Specific titles haven't been mentioned by the company, but Monster Hunter: Massive Hunting, which was released in February last year and stopped service in late March, is seen to be an especially major culprit when it comes to its mobile doldrums.

As a result of these factors, Capcom posted its 5 billion yen losses on March 31 for its quarterly earning report. This therefore has brought down its projected operating profits down by 2 billion yen to a total of 10 billion yen [approximately $100 million USD], with overall profits being reduced by 3.5 billion yen to a total of 3.3 billion yen [approximately $33 million USD].

Nevertheless, sales figures for Monster Hunter 4 far exceeded the company's projections, resulting in Capcom getting an extra 4.5 billion yen over its initial expectations for company-wide sales, upping the final number to 101.5 billion yen [approximately $1 billion USD] and marking the first time the company has crossed the 100 billion yen threshold. For better or for worse, Capcom has increasingly hedged its bets on the success of its Monster Hunter franchise.
 

mao2

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I think some greater clarification needs to be provided about what the Sankei article was actually discussing. The substance of the piece wasn't really about a potential Resident Evil 7 per se; Sankei was mostly asserting Capcom could announce it at E3 in an attempt to make up for losses incurred in mobile development and other problem areas. It's actually a pretty interesting piece all around about what sort of place Capcom is in financially and the predicament it's arguably finding itself in as result of not having hit smart phone games compliment their success with Monster Hunter, but the most pertinent bits are in the last two sections, which I already translated for Giant Bomb and will repost below. [EDIT: Per a friendly request and my own general desire to see things through to the end, I've gone ahead and translated the rest of its article so you can read it in its entirety.]



I'm not trying to put this out there as if to say I don't personally expect an RE game to show up at E3. Could it? Sure, I wouldn't be super surprised. I just think the importance of that as a point in the article is being overemphasized relative to what's actually being discussed. If people are interested in seeing the first parts translated, too, just to get the whole picture, I can probably whip something up in a jiffy, but none of it is really related to what this thread is talking about at least.
Thanks for the awesome translation Pepsiman! I'll add it to the OP so it'll be easier for everyone to see. I hope that whatever Capcom announces at E3 won't be a disappointment.
 

Prophet29

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Mar 23, 2014
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Capcom needs to RE back to its RE1 Gamecube remake roots or just let the franchise die. The world doesn't need a cheesy American FPS wannabe.
 

Proponent

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The thread title says PS4. Wouldn't RE7 be multiplatform?. Why does it say big announcement for PS4? If RE7 was exclusive, that would be Megaton.
 

stryke

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The thread title says PS4. Wouldn't RE7 be multiplatform?. Why does it say big announcement for PS4? If RE7 was exclusive, that would be Megaton.
The original article doesn't imply or say anything about exclusivity. It just doesn't mention x1.
 

Mushroomer25

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Wasn't it just a month ago that people were speculating that RE7 was a Microsoft exclusive?

I'm curious what RE7 is actually going to be, though. After 6, they need an RE4-style turnaround.
 

Hypereides

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Jan 19, 2009
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Naoki Fujiwara said:
"Unless Capcom learns to stop depending so much on its Monster Hunter franchise, it could well find itself in a bind down the road"
Even the japanese media agree. Capcom should be wise and take a listen.

"In contrast to traditional games, smartphone games routinely target more "casual" players, with qualitative emphasis on the development side focusing less on a game's craftsmanship and more on its monetization schemes and how to make money from its players"
I know the focus here is Capcom. But they aren't carrying this burden alone. They're aren't the only ones to blame. Squareenix is another prime example.

"As a result of these factors, Capcom posted its 5 billion yen losses on March 31 for its quarterly earning report. This therefore has brought down its projected operating profits down by 2 billion yen to a total of 10 billion yen [approximately $100 million USD], with overall profits being reduced by 3.5 billion yen to a total of 3.3 billion yen [approximately $33 million USD]."
"Nevertheless, sales figures for Monster Hunter 4 far exceeded the company's projections, resulting in Capcom getting an extra 4.5 billion yen over its initial expectations for company-wide sales, upping the final number to 101.5 billion yen [approximately $1 billion USD] and marking the first time the company has crossed the 100 billion yen threshold. For better or for worse, Capcom has increasingly hedged its bets on the success of its Monster Hunter franchise."
In correalation with the first citation. Affirms Capcom needs to extend their bat senses and sensitively, reaevaluate their projected outlook and not solely depend on the MH franchise.

"The company has faith that it'll put out a reputable game, but its monetization scheme could ultimately make or break it in the eyes of its fans."
Word.

"Meanwhile, on the Xbox One, the PS4's rival console made by Microsoft, Capcom has already put out a million-selling hit, but that console won't be coming to Japan until September. This has left Japanese gamers feeling left out in the cold while they're left waiting for a big new console game to play of their own."
"On top of that, sales of the Xbox One hardware are trailing behind that of the PS4, putting Capcom in a bind; even if it made a tactical error in focusing on developing for the Xbox One, they're too fargone to take it back at this stage."
Really showcases how opportunistic Capcom can be. They probably underestimated the PS4 hardwares sales-drive and demand. But at least they earned themselves a million-seller which is good.

Kind of exciting to see where Capcom will trail in the future, but they need to readjust/tweek some general work philosophies within company - and the communication line between the creative department and the top management needs to be strengthend. It seems weak imo.

I can understand why Capcom is being opportunistic, but ultimately it will continue damaging the ROI of their most powerful franchises, unless they start to sharpen the overalll quality of their creative output. They need something other than MH too keep it afloat - or else they'll eventually dull that down too.

The RE's software quality has taken a severe nose-dive, its reflected in it's low game media reception and poor consumer consensus - which shows through accumulated sales figures - shifting from installment (RE5) to installment (RE6).
 

gconsole

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I'm gonna go out on a limb here: Capcom, Platinum Games, Okami 2
Ammy and me still have ass to kick Capcom. Make it happen.
So after original Okami made by clover studio was not a financial success, Capcom will now hire the same group of people who already left the company doing the sequel to the same game.

Not sure which one is worse between this and Megaman crowd.
 

thelastword

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I think this is easily a port of Ultra Sf4 for the PS4, announce it at E3 and release day and date with the PS3/360 versions.