Dreams Game Informer Coverage This Month

Oct 12, 2012
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Much more at the link including short video of new games:

Our November issue chronicles the sights and sounds we saw (and made) in Dreams and outlines why we came away believing in the promise of Media Molecule’s bold vision. We have exclusive details on the game’s story mode, tools, and much more. Starting this week we’ll also have exclusive online content to support the story, including features, interviews, and gameplay footage.

https://www.gameinformer.com/2018/10/02/november-cover-revealed-dreams

 
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May 23, 2018
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My guess would be around mid-2019 with Days Gone coming from Bend in February. That said I feel like I know next to nothing about where Dreams is in the development process. If they said it was coming out in December this year I wouldn't be totally shocked, just as I feel I wouldn't be shocked if they said January 2020.
 
Likes: mckmas8808
May 24, 2005
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Seeing pics like this makes things so depressing. I want this game to be out so freaking bad, yet here we still are. The "look" of the game is so different that it's mind-blowing. I know the volumetric rendering will be used in hundreds of games next-gen, but now it's like a diamond in the rough. It's just so good looking.
 
Likes: ar0s
Oct 24, 2017
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May 26, 2011
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you know someone is going to remake minecraft, mario maker, and no mans sky. possibly gta5 too.

really looking forward to this. theres too much that i want to do. as an animator i could just focus on making animations. or do i spend time making/recreating films. or do i try making a game. theres too much i want to do
 
May 24, 2005
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Likes: Dunki
Oct 12, 2012
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For me, one of the cleverest things in that water above is the floating pallets. Remember, there is no water physics in Dreams. Whoever made this has had to use logic to give the impression those pallets are floating on the water and react realistically to the characters jumping on them. It's small things like this that blow me away more than anything.

If you're wondering where that is from, it's from the Game Informer vid I posted above. There's many snippets of never seen before footage in that and it's well worth the watch. I don't agree with everything they say, especially bringing it to PC, but all in all it's a good vid.
 
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Oct 12, 2012
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Man this game sure is revolutionary.

I may not have the time to create some of what we will be seeing, but I want this just to experience all the talent people will be pushing out.
Look at those pallets and remember, there is NO water physics in this game. That water is drawn and animated and those pallets are NOT sitting on anything physically emulated within the game engine:

 
#44
Look at those pallets and remember, there is NO water physics in this game. That water is drawn and animated and those pallets are NOT sitting on anything physically emulated within the game engine:

Really, objects could float in LBP with a different buoyancy stat. I would have thought they brought that over. Same with Water as a material. Seems like a lot of extra work for creators.

I am sort interested in this. The problem is more often than not style vs substance rose to the top in LBP since most people didn't actually play levels as they went for a quick look and moved on to the next.
 
Oct 12, 2012
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Really, objects could float in LBP with a different buoyancy stat. I would have thought they brought that over. Same with Water as a material. Seems like a lot of extra work for creators.

I am sort interested in this. The problem is more often than not style vs substance rose to the top in LBP since most people didn't actually play levels as they went for a quick look and moved on to the next.
I've been giving it a little thought but can't know for certain because I don't know all the settings:

We know you can turn solidity on and off but that can't be applied to the water itself because then the solid pallet would fall through. My guess would be an extra layer just above the water, used as a sensor. I'm assuming there will be a way of detecting whether an object is below or above (to left or right etc) of the sensor zone, shown in analogue form to enable 'intensity' or 'calculated distance'. This gives the pallet a point of reference for the animation.

Now, put a player sensor zone on either corner and join them in the centre (probably overlapped) along all edges. When the player approaches the maximum trigger point (of the corners) use that data to affect an animation to tilt the pallet down in that corner depending on the intensity (higher analogue value). How they do that I wouldn't know but I doubt it's by hand because it's too steady and consistent. But how do you get the 'edge' to tip equally if the trigger zones are focused on the corners? Between the corners, where the trigger zones overlap, add another animation which makes the full edge bob down. This would mean if Both corner trigger zones were active then animate the edge which would also be subject to the analogue value.

But there's also constant pressure there, or it appears there is. I can't be certain but it does look like if you stood on the edge and stayed there, the pallet would remain slightly submerged. This would suggest that it pauses the animation when a player stands there for any length of time. Then you have them moving around ...

I'm looking forward to digging into this thing.

 
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