Inktober 2017 |OT| Digital Artists Welcome

Raging Spaniard

If they are Dutch, upright and breathing they are more racist than your favorite player
Page 6 already? GAF! Last year was our biggest year and we got to 9 pages! You are all doing great!
 
This year I am following a list of really cool monsters, its called The Bad Guys Club... this is the first one:


I've been doing them and posting them on my Instagram. Will collect the finished illustrations on my portfolio but for now, they live on social media %y
 
6 days late... realised this is a great opportunity to do some art to help myself prep my NaNoWriMo idea :eek:

gonna use my chars© but follow the prompt list... maybe by the end, someone can guess my NaNo's plot/genre from the drawings like clues

couldn't find my red pen so had to settle for some bargain bin watercolour that doesn't deserve being pictured
 
Some quick newbie questions:

1. Are most of you sketching before inking, or going straight to the final lines?

2. As someone who doesn't know how to draw or ink, I assume I should always sketch first for now while I work on my seeing and proportions?

3. When working digitally, is there a typical zoom level I should use or NOT use to avoid bad habits? I also haven't been making the canvas high resolution but I could change that of course.



Disclaimer, I know part of the answer is "don't do digital at first" and "learn to draw before inking" but please humor me for this month. :p
 
Some quick newbie questions:

1. Are most of you sketching before inking, or going straight to the final lines?

**I draw in pencil and go over in ink. I only draw in pencil so as far as to let myself know what I need to do when I'm inking. Which is to say I'm only doing outlines in pencil.**


2. As someone who doesn't know how to draw or ink, I assume I should always sketch first for now while I work on my seeing and proportions?

**I think a good study/sketch always makes for a better piece, but you can do what you like. You may find something different works for you.**


3. When working digitally, is there a typical zoom level I should use or NOT use to avoid bad habits? I also haven't been making the canvas high resolution but I could change that of course.

**I think a number of people will say that you should stay working at "print size" and not zoom in on details too much as you might lose your sense of scale and impact of your strokes.**

Disclaimer, I know part of the answer is "don't do digital at first" and "learn to draw before inking" but please humor me for this month. :p
See edits above
 

Raging Spaniard

If they are Dutch, upright and breathing they are more racist than your favorite player
Some quick newbie questions:

1. Are most of you sketching before inking, or going straight to the final lines?

Slight sketch, but whatever is needed.

2. As someone who doesn't know how to draw or ink, I assume I should always sketch first for now while I work on my seeing and proportions?

YES, inking is about adding that extra finishing touch to a drawing, traditionally the progression is thumbnail>sketch>pencils>inks>color. Drawing straight with inks is added challenge that you take up later, as a "test your skill" minigmae, of sorts

3. When working digitally, is there a typical zoom level I should use or NOT use to avoid bad habits? I also haven't been making the canvas high resolution but I could change that of course.

A good habit is to have longer strokes instead of adding up a lot of small strokes. It takes a while to build a good stroke and it takes patience and trial and error. Digital can both help and be a crutch since real life consequences of analog can get you into clutch mode while digital with infinite redos can get you to be lackadaisical. Regarding zoom level it depends! For small areas zoom in, for larger areas like thighs or forearms try and zoom out a bit

Disclaimer, I know part of the answer is "don't do digital at first" and "learn to draw before inking" but please humor me for this month. :p
Not todays entry, just a warmup as I was filling up my brush pen with new ink. A dry brush can be really fun to sketch with

 
Some quick newbie questions:

1. Are most of you sketching before inking, or going straight to the final lines?

2. As someone who doesn't know how to draw or ink, I assume I should always sketch first for now while I work on my seeing and proportions?

3. When working digitally, is there a typical zoom level I should use or NOT use to avoid bad habits? I also haven't been making the canvas high resolution but I could change that of course.



Disclaimer, I know part of the answer is "don't do digital at first" and "learn to draw before inking" but please humor me for this month. :p
1. I usually do a pencil sketch before I go over with pen

2. yep, IMO pencil for practice. Although, if you wanna stick to ink for this, Pilot sells a good erasable-ink pen, Frixion I think it's called

3. IMO best to keep zoom level loose, not fix it at a certain level throughout; zoom in for detail, zoom out for overview, but always start drawing bird's-eye-view broad and then gradually narrow down to all details. But really I'm not the best to answer this question because I prefer traditional and if I can help it just use digital for cleaning up and/or colouring my scans...
 
Thanks for the replies, everyone. About the first answer, my concern about zooming in is that I don't want to lose or mess up a sense of scale and feel for the lines while trying to do detail.

I can try to make sure my monitor is roughly 1:1 with my tablet next time I draw, though my tablet is pretty tiny.
 
eh...

Some quick newbie questions:

1. Are most of you sketching before inking, or going straight to the final lines?

2. As someone who doesn't know how to draw or ink, I assume I should always sketch first for now while I work on my seeing and proportions?

3. When working digitally, is there a typical zoom level I should use or NOT use to avoid bad habits? I also haven't been making the canvas high resolution but I could change that of course.



Disclaimer, I know part of the answer is "don't do digital at first" and "learn to draw before inking" but please humor me for this month. :p
I'd say sketch, yeah.
For 3., like the others I'd advice to use the zoom for details only. You want to see the whole thing to make sure everything is proportionate first.
I work with a 300dpi resolution usually. Can be hard for my PC to keep up sometimes but it's great for resizing, coloring and things like that.
 
Some quick newbie questions:
1: Yeah, it usually helps me find mistakes early, or helps me work out a picture before I commit to finishing it

2: I’d say yeah.

3: What I do is make a huge canvas (3840 x 2160, or 4K at 300DPI) and zoom in somewhere and start sketching. 99% of the time I don’t use anywhere near that much room and crop it when it’s done. Bigger canvas helps me draw without worrying about it being too big to fit the page. This size would probably be overkill for you though, to be honest. It tends to be for me, anyways

As for zooming in: Zoom out enough to lightly sketch what you plan to do (helps with proportions) and zoom in when you need to work on details later in the drawing. Since you’re starting, you can worry less about all this though. Try keeping it zoomed enough where you can fit everything you’re doing first.
 
Bacon o.o

Some quick newbie questions:

1. Are most of you sketching before inking, or going straight to the final lines?

2. As someone who doesn't know how to draw or ink, I assume I should always sketch first for now while I work on my seeing and proportions?

3. When working digitally, is there a typical zoom level I should use or NOT use to avoid bad habits? I also haven't been making the canvas high resolution but I could change that of course.



Disclaimer, I know part of the answer is "don't do digital at first" and "learn to draw before inking" but please humor me for this month. :p
1) I've been doing rough sketches in a different sketchbook and then do a final sketch in a sketchbook I bought for inktober and then do inks on top of that one. I did do a couple sketches last year where I went straight into brush and ink, absolutely no underdrawing or preliminary sketch, but I likely won't do that this year.

2) I'd recommend sketching out some rough ideas of what you want to do prior to hitting that final image but it's up to you.

3) I'd say set up your canvas so you can see the entire thing and don't zoom while drawing/sketching. Always, always, ALWAYS do 300 ppi/dpi minimum for digital drawing, other than that stick with normal paper sizes I'd say. I like doing 9x12 inches
 
I should have stopped fitting all in one post like each 3 days. But this one I will end the week at least since it is only 2 days left

day 5 - "glass"

designed my own disney princess with her crown of glass
Would be kind awesome if the has like a very small or very big head so they can go all cinderella searching for her xD
 
First time working in physical for a while.

What's the thinnest-ass brush-pen you guys know? I've got my standard copic set but even the BS is a bit too large for delicate work and I don't want to use the smaller pens necessarily.

I should also go pick up an eraser, a blue-lead pacer and another white pen...
 

Raging Spaniard

If they are Dutch, upright and breathing they are more racist than your favorite player
Paying homage to the asshole playing the Vita on the train



Wanted some cleaner lines on this one
 
I started inktober late this year, so I'm a few days behind. Anyway, here are my entries for


October 4th:

Swaptober/Inktober entry, Lady Thanos:

October 5th:

Inktober entry, Ann Takamaki, a.k.a., Panther from Persona 5:

October 6th:

Inktober entry, Ryuji Sakamoto, a.k.a., Skull from Persona 5:

All entries were drawn in Clip Studio Paint, although for Skull I scanned a sketch from my sketchbook and inked it.

I usually do loose pencil sketches in Clip Studio Paint, do maybe an additional layer to refine stuff, then go straight to inks. For this Inktober, I haven't had much time to draw (mainly an hour or two at most), so I've been trying to produce them as fast as I can before I have to turn in for the night so I can get up for work on time!
 
I usually do loose pencil sketches in Clip Studio Paint, do maybe an additional layer to refine stuff, then go straight to inks. For this Inktober, I haven't had much time to draw (mainly an hour or two at most), so I've been trying to produce them as fast as I can before I have to turn in for the night so I can get up for work on time!
Hooray, a fellow Clip Studio Paint Pro user! Nice work.