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Space: The Final Frontier

Ventrue

Member
Jul 19, 2007
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Sallokin said:
Not sure if either of those are real, but they really are nice looking IMO.
They aren't, but they are.

Quellex said:
http://i26.tinypic.com/116i4cw.jpg
Haha, I think this first one was used as a reference for a planet in Mass Effect.
 

Windu

never heard about the cat, apparently
Mar 29, 2007
35,906
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Mama Smurf said:
Hourglass Nebula (or God)
Its following me......its alive!
How long can a human live unprotected in space?

If you don't try to hold your breath, exposure to space for half a minute or so is unlikely to produce permanent injury. Holding your breath is likely to damage your lungs, something scuba divers have to watch out for when ascending, and you'll have eardrum trouble if your Eustachian tubes are badly plugged up, but theory predicts -- and animal experiments confirm -- that otherwise, exposure to vacuum causes no immediate injury. You do not explode. Your blood does not boil. You do not freeze. You do not instantly lose consciousness.

Various minor problems (sunburn, possibly "the bends", certainly some [mild, reversible, painless] swelling of skin and underlying tissue) start after ten seconds or so. At some point you lose consciousness from lack of oxygen. Injuries accumulate. After perhaps one or two minutes, you're dying. The limits are not really known.

You do not explode and your blood does not boil because of the containing effect of your skin and circulatory system. You do not instantly freeze because, although the space environment is typically very cold, heat does not transfer away from a body quickly. Loss of consciousness occurs only after the body has depleted the supply of oxygen in the blood. If your skin is exposed to direct sunlight without any protection from its intense ultraviolet radiation, you can get a very bad sunburn.

At NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center (now renamed Johnson Space Center) we had a test subject accidentally exposed to a near vacuum (less than 1 psi) in an incident involving a leaking space suit in a vacuum chamber back in '65. He remained conscious for about 14 seconds, which is about the time it takes for O2 deprived blood to go from the lungs to the brain. The suit probably did not reach a hard vacuum, and we began repressurizing the chamber within 15 seconds. The subject regained consciousness at around 15,000 feet equivalent altitude. The subject later reported that he could feel and hear the air leaking out, and his last conscious memory was of the water on his tongue beginning to boil.

Aviation Week and Space Technology (02/13/95) printed a letter by Leonard Gordon which reported another vacuum-packed anecdote:

"The experiment of exposing an unpressurized hand to near vacuum for a significant time while the pilot went about his business occurred in real life on Aug. 16, 1960. Joe Kittinger, during his ascent to 102,800 ft (19.5 miles) in an open gondola, lost pressurization of his right hand. He decided to continue the mission, and the hand became painful and useless as you would expect. However, once back to lower altitudes following his record-breaking parachute jump, the hand returned to normal."
 

Teknoman

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Nov 7, 2007
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michaeld said:
If Nasa or the gov. knew anything, we would never be told I am sure. It would shake religious foundations and society.
I dunno why. Hell i'm "religious" yet think multiple universes are possible. If the diety you believe in is supposed to be all powerful, why cant that exist? But like previously posted, we probably shouldnt get into this.
 

mr_nexus

Banned
Dec 7, 2006
1,324
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Teknoman said:
I dunno why. Hell i'm "religious" yet think multiple universes are possible. If the diety you believe in is supposed to be all powerful, why cant that exist? But like previously posted, we probably shouldnt get into this.
All though I'm not really that religious(sorta a Deist) I agree with you. If God exists in some form or another than it can be responsible for multiple universes and and the whole structure of existence. We are just small particles in this vast universe and our knowledge of it is nowhere near the tip of the iceberg.
 

mr_nexus

Banned
Dec 7, 2006
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ManaByte

Banned
Jun 10, 2004
20,366
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mr_nexus said:
These look fake but I mean that in a good way. The images look so surreal it's hard to accept them. I hope a new competition for the moon will be heating up. I want to see more stuff like this.
It is. NASA hopes to be back on the moon by 2020 with the Constellation program. I was at the Kennedy Space Center last month and they already were talking about the program on the tour bus videos.
 

RiZ III

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Jun 6, 2004
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Mashing said:
What the hell? This planet (moon) is in Mass Effect. I"m guessing they probably used actual photos for the basis of their planets.

Edit: I am pwned
:lol :lol
 

Teknoman

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Nov 7, 2007
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ManaByte said:
It is. NASA hopes to be back on the moon by 2020 with the Constellation program. I was at the Kennedy Space Center last month and they already were talking about the program on the tour bus videos.
2020? Why is it taking them so long to make return trips in the first place? Was the first trip there just so they could hurry and 1-up the Russians Cosmonauts? I mean I know money is probably an issue...but the technology gap between now and then is pretty huge... Then again, maybe its just because the Space station isnt finished yet, and it would be better to have a waypoint.
 

Windu

never heard about the cat, apparently
Mar 29, 2007
35,906
0
0
Teknoman said:
2020? Why is it taking them so long to make return trips in the first place? Was the first trip there just so they could hurry and 1-up the Russians Cosmonauts? I mean I know money is probably an issue...but the technology gap between now and then is pretty huge... Then again, maybe its just because the Space station isnt finished yet, and it would be better to have a waypoint.
They have to finish the ISS first, I don't think they have a big enough budget to do both at the same time.

edit: rftl
 

xabre

Banned
Jun 11, 2004
4,975
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Some of the most influential leaders of the space community are quietly working to offer the next U.S. president an alternative to President Bush's "vision for space exploration"--one that would delete a lunar base and move instead toward manned missions to asteroids along with a renewed emphasis on Earth environmental spacecraft.

Top U.S. planetary scientists, several astronauts and former NASA division directors will meet privately at Stanford University on Feb. 12-13 to define these sweeping changes to the NASA/Bush administration Vision for Space Exploration (VSE).

Abandoning the Bush lunar base concept in favor of manned asteroid landings could also lead to much earlier manned flights to Mars orbit, where astronauts could land on the moons Phobos or Deimos.
http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/ASTER01188.xml&headline=Space Leaders Work To Replace Lunar Base With Manned Asteroid Missions&channel=space

This is about the dumbest space related thing I've heard quite frankly.
 

Windu

never heard about the cat, apparently
Mar 29, 2007
35,906
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I think they probably know more about where NASA needs to go than you and Bush combined...
Well I'm pretty sure Bush didn't make the plan to go back to the moon, NASA probably did and they are smart too, Bush just approved it.
Asteroids? strange.
 

ManaByte

Banned
Jun 10, 2004
20,366
1
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Teknoman said:
2020? Why is it taking them so long to make return trips in the first place? Was the first trip there just so they could hurry and 1-up the Russians Cosmonauts? I mean I know money is probably an issue...but the technology gap between now and then is pretty huge... Then again, maybe its just because the Space station isnt finished yet, and it would be better to have a waypoint.
It's been 30 years since the last manned moon mission. They aren't going to be sending the shuttles to the moon. The shuttle orbiters are being retired in 2010. Then Lockheed will finish building the Nova and Ares with the first flight being around 2014.
 

Deku

Banned
Jan 6, 2005
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カナダ
It's money. The space agencies are being ask to do way more than land a couple of astronauts for a few days with much less money, most of it only earmarked.

We could land on mars with today's technology if there was the budgetary stomach to do so. Lets say, if the US deleted the Iraq war, a trillion dollars could make a lot of things happen in terms of manned spaceflight.
 

Alfarif

This picture? uhh I can explain really!
Jan 28, 2007
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So, wait...

1) If you take off your space suit in space, you don't immediately blow up to the size of a whale? You just kind of... lose consciousness and suffocate over the cours eof a couple minutes? Wow, all those space movies have it soooo wrong then.

2) The ISS is the reason we haven't even done anything more than go out and repair satellites for the last 30 years? That really sucks.
 

Windu

never heard about the cat, apparently
Mar 29, 2007
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Alfarif said:
So, wait...

1) If you take off your space suit in space, you don't immediately blow up to the size of a whale? You just kind of... lose consciousness and suffocate over the cours eof a couple minutes? Wow, all those space movies have it soooo wrong then.
You lose consciouseness after 15 secs or something like that and eventually die. I read that "Mission to Mars" was probably the most accurate.

2) The ISS is the reason we haven't even done anything more than go out and repair satellites for the last 30 years? That really sucks.
ISS construction started in 1998. I think the reason we haven't done much manned missions except for ISS and a few other stuff is the technology hasn't always been there to go to mars and the big thing MONEY. I'm no expert though so take it with a grain of salt.
 

Arthas

Banned
Sep 9, 2007
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Apparently you can survive for quite some time on the surface of mars without a space suit. (provided you can hold your breath). None of that total recall stuff.
Of course, you will come out of it with some damage to your system.
 

Alfarif

This picture? uhh I can explain really!
Jan 28, 2007
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This ability to survive in space for some time and not have all that cartoony stuff happen to you totally intrigues me. Something... is wrong... with me. :lol :lol
 

Peru

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Dec 18, 2005
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Imagine the first guy who discovered that galaxy... peeking around with his telescope, the old clusters and stars. Suddenly a giant eye is staring back at you from deep space.
 

Alfarif

This picture? uhh I can explain really!
Jan 28, 2007
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Peru said:
Imagine the first guy who discovered that galaxy... peeking around with his telescope, the old clusters and stars. Suddenly a giant eye is staring back at you from deep space.
Yeah... when I discovered it, i pooped myself.
 

Alfarif

This picture? uhh I can explain really!
Jan 28, 2007
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xabre said:
Messenger trajectory path -

How do you even begin to calculate something like that?

And I agree, impulse drives can't come soon enough. It's like skipping freakin' stones on the surface of a lake and hoping you don't hit the kids swimming nearby.
 

Dolphin

Banned
Apr 20, 2006
2,693
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0
Alfarif said:
How do you even begin to calculate something like that?

And I agree, impulse drives can't come soon enough. It's like skipping freakin' stones on the surface of a lake and hoping you don't hit the kids swimming nearby.
Nah, more like skipping a stone in a lake full of kids with ADHD and hoping your stone hits every one of them, then sends water splashing into your bucket before sinking to the bottom.
 

Escape Goat

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Jun 6, 2004
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DC
Brannigan: "Kif, I'm feeling the captains itch."

Kif: "I'll get the powder, Sir."

Brannigan: "Nooo, the itch for adventure. Prepare to change course."

Kif: "Sir, this is a leisure cruise. Our path was set by the travel agency."

Brannigan: "That's for school girls, now here is a course with some chesthair."

Kif: "But..that course leads directly through a swarm of comets."

Brannigna: "Yes, comets, the icebergs of the sky. By jackknifing from one to the next at breakneck speed, we might just get something of a gravityboost...or something."

Kif: [sigh]

Brannigan: "It's time to shove a jallapeno up this ship's tailpipe! Divert power from the shields, full speed ahead."
 

Walshicus

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Aug 10, 2007
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Prince8 said:
Ceres? Never heard of that?
It's been known for centuries. In fact it was originally considered a planet for... um... around eighty years I think.

How much do you think it would cost to update all the school rooms in the world to be "compliant" with the 11 [or 8] planet solar system?
 

Deku

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Jan 6, 2005
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Beautiful

from the New Horizons probe bound for the planet dwarf planet Pluto.

nasa said:
As the New Horizons spacecraft continues its journey, it gives to those of us who are Earth bound breathtaking images of our solar system. In February of last year, New Horizons passed Jupiter and the ever-active Jovian moon Io. In this montage, Jupiter was captured in three bands of infrared light making the Great Red Spot look white. Complex hurricane-like ovals, swirls, and planet-ringing bands are visible in Jupiter's complex atmosphere. Io is digitally superposed in natural color. Fortuitously, a plume was emanating from Io's volcano Tvashtar. Frost and sulfuric lava cover the volcanic moon, while red-glowing lava is visible beneath the blue sunlight-scattering plume. The robotic New Horizons spacecraft is on track to arrive at Pluto in 2015.
 

Souldriver

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Jan 8, 2006
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Amir0x said:
god guys why is the galaxy so fucking awesome

every new magical space image is like receiving a cosmic blowjob or some shit
And to think we haven't even seen a fraction of it. It's like we've just opened the front door of our house and are looking down the street, while the rest of the world is still waiting for us to be explored.
 

xabre

Banned
Jun 11, 2004
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santouras said:
Mars.

The largest canyon system in the solar system, Valles Marineris, is located there as well. It looks like a giant surface scar from space.
 

cjdunn

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Jan 22, 2007
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Souldriver said:
And to think we haven't even seen a fraction of it. It's like we've just opened the front door of our house and are looking down the street, while the rest of the world is still waiting for us to be explored.
And cue:
 

Animal

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Jun 1, 2005
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Congratulations GAF. A truly worthy thread. I can't remember the last one.

<--- Nerdy and proud.