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"Advocate of ending U.S. birthright citizenship may be joining Trump administration"

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Zen Aku

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Aug 24, 2016
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An article from The Washington Post posted on January 26, 2017 speculate that:

A prominent advocate of ending U.S. birthright citizenship is in line to join the Trump administration in an immigration-related position at the Department of Homeland Security, according to two former U.S. officials informed of transition changes by department personnel.

Jon D. Feere has been a legal policy analyst for the Center for Immigration Studies, a conservative group that calls for added immigration restrictions.

Reached Tuesday by a Washington Post reporter, Feere said, ”I'm in between jobs. That's all I can say right now. I can't confirm anything" about accounts circulating among some current and former DHS officials that he would join the department in an immigration enforcement post.

Feere, 37, testified before the House Judiciary subcommittee on immigration in 2015 and has written several opinion pieces, including an August 2015 article in TheHill.com, proposing alternatives to a constitutional amendment by which Congress could enact a law or President Trump could issue an executive order denying citizenship, U.S. passports or Social Security numbers to American-born children of people in the country illegally.

Feere in 2010 estimated those births at between 300,000 and 400,000 a year, according to information on the CIS website. Other estimates put the figure lower. About 275,000 babies were born to unauthorized-immigrant parents in 2014, according to Pew Research Center estimates based on government data.

”President Obama has demonstrated that unilateral action by the executive branch is a legitimate means of changing the nation's immigration policy," Feere wrote in his 2015 article. ”Though his actions have been controversial, executive actions that direct agencies how to approach birthright citizenship are arguably more justifiable."

Feere added, ”Whether Trump worked with Congress to draft legislation or simply directed agencies to apply the Citizenship Clause more narrowly, the issue would likely end up at the Supreme Court."

Feere's name surfaced as GOP congressional judiciary committee staffers were said by former officials to be in the running for other homeland security positions. Those under consideration reportedly include Tracy L. Short, a House panel counsel who formerly served as deputy chief counsel with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Atlanta office, and Gene P. Hamilton, a Senate panel counsel for Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), Trump's pick for attorney general.

Spokeswomen for Sessions and the House committee did not return requests for comment Wednesday, and Short and Hamilton did not respond to email messages seeking comment.

The administration's potential staffing moves come under a spotlight as Trump began signing executive orders Wednesday on immigration matters including enabling construction of his proposed wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Sessions has been an advocate of a tougher crackdown on immigration, although it remained unclear what steps Trump may undertake regarding the Obama administration's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA. The 2012 initiative has given temporary protection from deportation to hundreds of thousands of people who arrived in the United States as children. Trump vowed during the campaign to reverse it.

Denying citizenship to U.S. born children of illegal immigrants would open a new battleground.

”If there is a policy tug of war between the [Trump chief strategist Stephen K.] Bannon faction and the [chief of staff Reince] Priebus faction . . . assuming those things even exist, there's still lots of hawkish people likely to be appointed in the various agencies," said Mark Krikorian, CIS executive director. Krikorian declined to comment about Feere.

”Personnel is policy, and the people getting the important policy positions in places like ICE and Customs and Border Protection are likely to be pretty strong pro-enforcement people, as opposed to Bush administration leftovers," Krikorian said.

Feere and other critics of birthright citizenship have argued government action is needed because of the numbers of such children, and what they say is a rise of ”birth tourism" and a phenomenon of ”chain migration" in which U.S. citizens can sponsor immediate family members to come into the country.

When Congress considered legislation in 1995 to end automatic citizenship for children born to people who entered the U.S. illegally, opponents said it would contradict U.S. constitutional history and tradition and said the 14th Amendment established a ”bright-line" principle that being born on American soil makes one a U.S. citizen.

The amendment was passed in response to the 1856 Dred Scott decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that found that no person of African descent could ever become a citizen, and was upheld in 1898 by the court in a challenge to the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited anyone of Chinese ancestry from remaining in the country.

Defending the principle in an NPR interview in 2010, former assistant attorney general and acting solicitor general Walter Dellinger traced it to America's racial history and immigrant identity.

”We believe in a clean slate principle" and that ”whatever questions there are about the legitimacy of parents or grandparents, in our country, you get a clean slate," Dellinger said. ”Every new child who is born here is simply and indisputably an American. And that is part of our almost unique national identity."

I hope this isn't something that will become an issue. I, myself am an immigrant here from a very young age, my brother was born here (thankfully when both of my parents were already naturalized citizens). But I can see this affecting a lot of families. Considering how crazy things have been, I honestly wouldn't put it past this administration on trying something like this.
 

rjinaz

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well of course this is going to be on the agenda. After wall, but before mass deportations.
 

StarCreator

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Oct 26, 2007
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Yeah, fuck this. I'm a birthright citizen to immigrant parents (who are now naturalized citizens). This isn't the country my parents sacrificed their old lives to immigrate to.
 
Jan 7, 2009
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You know what, I'm just going to pretend he's the real life Hitler so that the actual news coming out in reality doesn't sound as bad.
 

RK128

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This is horrific.......really, really hope this doesn't happen. If he is brought on to Trumps team, they might pull a EO that fucks with the 14th Amendment and just like the Immigration Ban they pulled just a day ago, it will bring chaos in the US.

I hate how things are getting worse and worse.....
 

GameAddict411

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Aug 4, 2013
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14th amendment is pretty clear. How can an EO overrule that?
It's pretty clear but the Republicans are pretty smart with finding loop holes. Amending the Constitution is extremely difficult so they could possibly impose bans on issuing visas to pregnant tourists or non immigrants, or they could also increase requirements to get paperwork or hospital care.
 

Afrodium

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Apr 21, 2009
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After this weekend I think people are starting to wake up, but a good chunk of this country needs to understand that were on the precipice of some dark shit. We need all the help we can get.
 

Pastry

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It's pretty clear but the Republicans are pretty smart with finding loop holes. Amending the Constitution is extremely difficult so they could possibly impose bans on issuing visas to pregnant tourists or non immigrants, or they could also increase requirements to get paperwork or hospital care.

"Birth tourism" is the excuse used to end birth right citizenship for undocumented immigrants from Mexico. What you described doesn't actually solve the "problem" for them. This is about poor brown people, not rich pregnant immigrants.
 

ezrarh

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The US is pretty unique with its birthright citizenship, although I'm not forgetting Canada. Of course the Republicans want to end it when too many brown people are coming.
 

Zereta

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By the time I graduate college here in the US (I'm an international student) Spring next year, I'm not gonna be able to even try to work and live and start a family with my American girlfriend, am I?
 

kswiston

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The US is pretty unique with its birthright citizenship, although I'm not forgetting Canada. Of course the Republicans want to end it when too many brown people are coming.

It's a Western Hemisphere thing. Almost all of us are descended from immigrants.
 

Captiosus

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I was wondering where the "Anchor Babies" phrase went.
It became "Birth Tourism".
Ugh.
 
Jun 13, 2014
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The US is pretty unique with its birthright citizenship, although I'm not forgetting Canada. Of course the Republicans want to end it when too many brown people are coming.

There are only 33 countries world wide that grant birthright citizenship and pretty much all of them are in North and South America and the Caribbean. No European country gives it, and only Pakistan in Asia does. Most countries require at least one parent to be a legal citizen.

That said for a nation founded on immigration and with massive areas of land, it is pretty silly to roll it back. 300k a year is hardly a blip, way more people die in the USA every year. It would become an issue if stuff like basic income or universal healthcare were to ever pass, but that is not likely anytime soon.
 

zethren

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By the time I graduate college here in the US (I'm an international student) Spring next year, I'm not gonna be able to even try to work and live and start a family with my American girlfriend, am I?

Hopefully he'll have been impeached by then, and our govt will get off its ass and defend the constitution.
 

kswiston

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I only recently learned how rare it is for countries to actually do this.

It's not rare for the Americas



Dark blue countries have birthright citizenship
 

FZZ

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Jun 5, 2013
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There are only 33 countries world wide that grant birthright citizenship and pretty much all of them are in North and South America and the Caribbean. No European country gives it, and only Pakistan in Asia does. Most countries require at least one parent to be a legal citizen.

That said for a nation founded on immigration and with massive areas of land, it is pretty silly to roll it back. 300k a year is hardly a blip, way more people die in the USA every year. It would become an issue if stuff like basic income or universal healthcare were to ever pass, but that is not likely anytime soon.

Ayyyyyy
 
Jul 23, 2016
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So, by 2027 all American citizens will be white. I'm quite sure he'll be re-elected in 2022.

Trump could successfully ban ALL immigration and it still wouldn't stop white people from becoming a shrinking demographic. The white fertility rate is well below replacement level.
 

ezrarh

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It's a Western Hemisphere thing. Almost all of us are descended from immigrants.

Right, I was thinking more "Western" countries - by that I mean white dominated countries. Doesn't mean I think we should end it. There's plenty of room to grow as a country - we just have to be better with growth accommodation (easier to create more housing, denser, etc)
 
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