First mention of Nintendo in North America? - Oct 8, 1955

Mar 7, 2007
4,612
5
895
#13
LaneDS said:
I had a similar thought... what was his role with the company in 1955? Was he the emperor then?
I know that when he became president he fired most of his old management to be sure to have the absolute control of the company.
 

Angry Grimace

Two cannibals are eating a clown. One turns to the other and says "does something taste funny to you?"
Mar 16, 2007
61,162
0
0
#18
MattyGrovesOrMe said:
Fast Forward 30 Years, Fall of 1985, and the NY Times gives you this:



"Actual shadows?"

Archives. Hours of Entertainment.
It's so weird thinking about the context of that ad. "Nintendo Robot Video System," and the entire wording of the article, which carefully avoids the use of the word "video game," or "gaming" at all, due to the fact that Video Gaming was seen as a played-out trend due to the '84 Gaming Crash. Hence why R.O.B. is so prominent in those initial ads and showcases despite the fact that history shows us that R.O.B. was used in like one game and didn't work all that well. :lol
 
Jan 10, 2008
6,569
0
0
Columbus
#19
Mama Robotnik said:
The Playing Card NPD days must have been amazing.

They were too busy producing casual playing cards for the polio mom crowd. Explaining the rules of poker on every card ruined the entire playing card experience for me. I had to switch over to a different brand where the cards were printed using significantly more DPI because the jaggies produced by the Nintendo playing card company ruined the immersion I had while playing blackjack.

Long story short. The Nintendo trading cards, while fundamentally sound, lacked execution and were nothing more than a fad. This is why you don't see the company producing trading cards any more.
 

RSTEIN

Comics, serious business!
Mar 22, 2007
10,803
0
0
#23
Why would you do that? said:
One day, I'm gonna create a company named like "Our Success Depends on Our Diligence Co., Ltd." or "We're Destined to Mercilessly Crush the Competition Inc." People will love us. Maybe.
Why would you do that?
 
Dec 3, 2004
2,590
142
1,325
#29
Tenks said:
They were too busy producing casual playing cards for the polio mom crowd. Explaining the rules of poker on every card ruined the entire playing card experience for me. I had to switch over to a different brand where the cards were printed using significantly more DPI because the jaggies produced by the Nintendo playing card company ruined the immersion I had while playing blackjack.

Long story short. The Nintendo trading cards, while fundamentally sound, lacked execution and were nothing more than a fad. This is why you don't see the company producing trading cards any more.
lol, the jaggies were too sharp ;) but yeah they still produce those trading cards.
 

MisterHero

Super Member
Jul 24, 2007
30,357
1
0
abload.de
#42
Wooooooooow @ EmCeeGramr

:lol :lol :lol

A blood feud!

Stumpokapow said:
Young Hiroshi Yamauchi
Yamauchi didn't seek a deal with Disney to promote their cards, Disney begged him to use their characters!

Most awesome guy to ever wear a business suit.
 
Jan 6, 2005
7,529
0
0
#44
Vinci said:
Wikipedia says they were founded in 1889.
It wouldn't be too surprising for the mark to have been used before formal incorporation, or for that matter for a '50s NYT wire reporter to flub the conversion from Japanese to Western year numbers.

On the other hand, I'm pretty sure that wonderful, wonderful photoshop means discussion is done in this thread. :lol
 

MisterHero

Super Member
Jul 24, 2007
30,357
1
0
abload.de
#46
MattyGrovesOrMe said:
Needs to include reference to Nintendo spokesperson Reginald Fitz-Arnold denying claims of an HD card upgrade. :D
No, instead of HD, Pachter should insist that Nintendo invest in Pantone Color technology, printed on glossy plastic, instead of archaic card stock and offset printing!
 

Kilrogg

paid requisite penance
Jan 4, 2007
9,256
0
0
#48
Seriously, that picture is made all the funnier by the fact that one of the smart moves Nintendo made as far as playing card "tech" was concerned was to go from high-quality, finely crafted cards to mundane, yet sturdier, more convenient plastic cards.

History repeats itself.