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Massive prehistoric virus unearthed from Siberia's frozen wasteland.

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Raticus79

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Aug 3, 2012
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Any Biology majors here?

Why would these ancient viruses be more genetically complex than modern day ones, like the Influenza strain?

Perhaps they can learn something from it and use that knowledge to work on cures for modern illnesses.

Other than that, it's probably morbid curiosity lol

The extra genes are for doing the total conversions on cells, turning bodies into bacteria factories which eventually explode to spread airborne during phase 1 of the invasion.

Not a biology student, but I'd expect that viruses become smaller over time as any genes which aren't absolutely necessary for propagation get filtered out
 

MrChocolate

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May 9, 2012
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I sometimes wonder if scientists just want to make movie scenarios to happen.

I mean, why even revive it? do we really need to?

Global warming by itself could revive a lot of these ancient viruses and bacteria or whatever.
It's better to study those viruses before shit happens, than after.
 

Nivash

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Nov 13, 2013
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What is dead may never die, but rises again, harder and stronger.

Damn, I was going to post that - because in this case it's true. Viruses never die because technically they were never fully alive. They disintegrate over time as their genetic material degenerates, like all biological matter, but they can be almost impossibly hardy if they're left in a state where their genes are protected from things such as sunlight, radiation or other chemical processes. Being locked in permafrost for millennia is probably more or less optimal.
 

orochi91

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The extra genes are for doing the total conversions on cells, turning bodies into bacteria factories which eventually explode to spread airborne during phase 1 of the invasion.

Not a biology student, but I'd expect that viruses become smaller over time as any genes which aren't absolutely necessary for propagation get filtered out

I was actually nodding in agreement until I reached the invasion part.

Lol, I got trolled.
 

GeeTeeCee

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Oct 27, 2014
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If someone told me this was viral marketing for a film or something, I would probably believe them.

You could just, you know, not wake the ancient giant virus up. I'm sure that's an option.
 

commedieu

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Jan 10, 2009
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Damn, I was going to post that - because in this case it's true. Viruses never die because technically they were never fully alive. They disintegrate over time as their genetic material degenerates, like all biological matter, but they can be almost impossibly hardy if they're left in a state where their genes are protected from things such as sunlight, radiation or other chemical processes. Being locked in permafrost for millennia is probably more or less optimal.
And finally we agree... :D



This is the end!!!! ... jk...


Kind of..

 

JC Sera

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As to anyone worried about this infecting humans, giant viruses can only infect amoeba.
They enter the virus by the cell engulfing them, rather than a forced entry like most other viruses, then reproducing.

They can get in the human body, but its found that they will survive macrophage engulfment, due to their particular way of cell up take. However they lie inert in the macrophage, because all their parts are design to high jack amoeba cell organs, rather than mammalian.

30,000 year old virus, especially a highly complex & big one, wouldn't be able to infect humans, due to size and high niche specificity.

(Also giant viruses can get infected by virophages and thats so cool viruses inside your viruses)
 

MrChocolate

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As to anyone worried about this infecting humans, giant viruses can only infect amoeba.
They enter the virus by the cell engulfing them, rather than a forced entry like most other viruses, then reproducing.

They can get in the human body, but its found that they will survive macrophage engulfment, due to their particular way of cell up take. However they lie inert in the macrophage, because all their parts are design to high jack amoeba cell organs, rather than mammalian.

30,000 year old virus, especially a highly complex & big one, wouldn't be able to infect humans, due to size and high niche specificity.

(Also giant viruses can get infected by virophages and thats so cool viruses inside your viruses)

So this bit

Before waking it up, researchers will have to verify that the bug cannot cause animal or human disease.

Is horseshit?
 

Nivash

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And finally we agree... :D



This is the end!!!! ... jk...


Kind of..

Hey, at least going out due to MegaVirus or the Sabred Tooth Tigre Flu has a nice ring to it. Much better than Swine Flu. God, I hate Swine Flu. We would so have had to rename it something a bit more ominous if that had turned out to be the end.
 

Nivash

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So this bit is horseshit?


Scientists watch disaster movies too. They know that if they don't say that they're making sure it's safe there's a reasonable possibility that people will just assume they're playing God, and then they'll spend the rest of their project dealing with stupid questions and even more stupid protesters
 

JC Sera

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So this bit



Is horseshit?
Its more poor scientists have to say stuff like that everytime so people don't go in a paranoid tizzy
like the article immediately linked waking up the spanish flu to waking up this virus does that tell you anything?

Its also just good health and safety practice & protocol.

If an ancient virus was woken up and going to kill us all, it would more likely be a bacteriophage that wrecks all our native fauna, than a virus that targets humans themselves.

Or a retrovirus waking up in our own genome.
 

Spladam

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Jun 12, 2015
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a virus is resurrected...

it has 2500 genes....

a normal virus has 8...


get ready for....

Gigantovirus - The Massive Prehistoric Virus

Trump, save us!

We had a good run, folks...

SiberiaGAF, are you still there? SiberiaGAF, please respond!

Siberia has gone dark, sir. No response.

I knew this thread was gonna be funny. So should I just upload my SKYNET AI today to get ahead of this? Was waiting for the right moment....
 

blakep267

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Dec 9, 2013
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So after the research base goes dark, we're gonna send in highly unqualified mercs to check everything out, right? right?
 

Zekes!

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These scientists are so preoccupied with if they could, they haven't stopped to think about whether they should
 

Spladam

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Jun 12, 2015
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Any Biology majors here?

Why would these ancient viruses be more genetically complex than modern day ones, like the Influenza strain?



Perhaps they can learn something from it and use that knowledge to work on cures for modern illnesses.

Other than that, it's probably morbid curiosity lol

I think genetic evolution actually refines things to need less code thus less complexity, like efficient program code does more with less.

Edit- of course I'm just guessing here.
 

Kinyou

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Sep 12, 2009
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How likely is it that unfreezing that virus will cure cancer? I think the risk assessment should be done on that basis.
 

Spladam

Member
Jun 12, 2015
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bacteriophage

Giant Virus

Sputnik


like if your gonna shitpost about giant viruses invading at least don't use bacteriophage images

I totally prefer the bacteriophage image, much cooler looking. Crazy high posting standards in Off Topic though. Wow.
 
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