Time Cube Redux: Space Moors, Freemasons, black means white, there was no slavery

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Nov 5, 2007
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The OP's ongoing insistence that people need to listen to real hip-hop all makes sense now.

Most modern hip-hop is made by black people, who are really white people, so they're stealing the culture from the real black people...who are also white?

Wait a second.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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When Columbus first came to the Americas he thought he was in India, hence why Native American's were called Indians. Well now we must look into the past of India during the times of Columbus and see what the Indians from India looked like.
According to one of the links you provided the theory is that ancient African civilizations had boats that could cross the Atlantic and reach the shores of south and central America. That was the genesis of "Africans being the first Americans" thought. So how could boats from the 1300s reach the Americas but boats from the 1800s can't make the same journey?
 
Apr 17, 2011
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When Columbus first came to the Americas he thought he was in India, hence why Native American's were called Indians. Well now we must look into the past of India during the times of Columbus and see what the Indians from India looked like.
But when the Indians first came to India, who really were the Indians. Were the Indians the Indians or the Indians the Indians the Indians?
 
Jun 10, 2004
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Like comparing a apple to a orange.
apple (n.)
Old English æppel "apple; any kind of fruit; fruit in general," from Proto-Germanic *ap(a)laz (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch appel, Old Norse eple, Old High German apful, German Apfel), from PIE *ab(e)l "apple" (cognates: Gaulish avallo "fruit;" Old Irish ubull, Lithuanian obuolys, Old Church Slavonic jabloko "apple"), but the exact relation and original sense of these is uncertain (compare melon).

In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (such as Old English fingeræppla "dates," literally "finger-apples;" Middle English appel of paradis "banana," c.1400). Hence its grafting onto the unnamed "fruit of the forbidden tree" in Genesis. Cucumbers, in one Old English work, are eorþæppla, literally "earth-apples" (compare French pomme de terre "potato," literally "earth-apple;" see also melon). French pomme is from Latin pomum "apple; fruit" (see Pomona).



Apples and oranges are the same thing.
 

Staccat0

Fail out bailed
Apr 13, 2007
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Austin, TX
apple (n.)
Old English æppel "apple; any kind of fruit; fruit in general," from Proto-Germanic *ap(a)laz (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Dutch appel, Old Norse eple, Old High German apful, German Apfel), from PIE *ab(e)l "apple" (cognates: Gaulish avallo "fruit;" Old Irish ubull, Lithuanian obuolys, Old Church Slavonic jabloko "apple"), but the exact relation and original sense of these is uncertain (compare melon).

In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (such as Old English fingeræppla "dates," literally "finger-apples;" Middle English appel of paradis "banana," c.1400). Hence its grafting onto the unnamed "fruit of the forbidden tree" in Genesis. Cucumbers, in one Old English work, are eorþæppla, literally "earth-apples" (compare French pomme de terre "potato," literally "earth-apple;" see also melon). French pomme is from Latin pomum "apple; fruit" (see Pomona).



Apples and oranges are the same thing.
Don't read anything on this website but it basically proves my point
 
Aug 1, 2009
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