Hollywood Directors team up against the scourge of TV Motion Smoothing

Should TV manufacturers make a filter that adds chromatic aberration to your TV?


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wenis

Registered for GAF on September 11, 2001.
#1
[Polygon]

James Gunn, the director of Slither, both Guardians of the Galaxy films and the under-appreciated Super recently tweeted about his hatred of the feature, and the fact it’s turned on as the default for so many displays. His message included some big names, all supporting the death of motion smoothing.


Rian Johnson, who directed Brick, Looper, three amazing Breaking Bad episodes and something called Star Wars: The Last Jedi didn’t bother trying to hide his disgust at how deeply the option can be hidden in menus, and how bad it can make movies look.


Reed Morano directed the first three episodes of The Handmaid’s Tale, and she’s been fighting the good fight for a while now.


Bless em all and godspeed! Motion Smoothing should be shot into the sun.
 
#5
Good. Content should be watched at the source frame rate and aspect ratio without any of these post processing gimmicks.
 
#6
It took way, way too long for this campaign to start up. This has been a major problem in televisions for something 8+ years now (probably longer). It's arguably okay in Sports, but it ruins every other kind of media. Honestly it shouldn't even exist.
 
#9
It took way, way too long for this campaign to start up. This has been a major problem in televisions for something 8+ years now (probably longer). It's arguably okay in Sports, but it ruins every other kind of media. Honestly it shouldn't even exist.
And some sports are broadcast at 60fps anyway. I know baseball is slowly coming into the fold on this.
 

Days like these...

Poonani should have a ph balance of 0
#13
I remember when it first came out many years ago and alot of people (me included) complained about how everything looked like a soap opera. People were saying 'but, but, but, it's the future you'll get used it!'
 
#15
If consumers want to go out of their way to fuck up their image quality, that's fine. The DEFAULT factory settings shouldn't be screwing with the source.
I remember when it first came out many years ago and alot of people (me included) complained about how everything looked like a soap opera. People were saying 'but, but, but, it's the future you'll get used it!'
You might be thinking of high framerate content, which is slowly becoming more common.
 
#21
Way too many people want to watch soap operas instead of movies and shows. Looks horrible
Good. fuck that soap opera shit.
This is the unfortunate side effect of the soap operas of the 80s and 90s - anything that looks high frame rate or smooth has embedded the association of "cheap soap opera" into the general public, and this turned a lot of people off the technical aspects of The Hobbit.

People have this ingrained idea that it's only a "film" if it's 24fps. It "feels filmic" or "has that filmic look". And rightfully so - the 24fps standard has been around for decades and has been used for almost every movie they've watched.

But 24fps is only a number that was chosen because it was the tradeoff between motion fidelity and cost. It was good enough and cheap enough to be widely adopted. Unfortunately it's also terribly limiting in some cases, but attempting to go against the grain is often met with revulsion from film purists.

We need more big budget, high frame rate content, especially for action and sci-fi films where temporal fidelity is important. This will help change the perception and make it more acceptable to have high frame rate content for films that would benefit from it. Can you imagine Fast & Furious or Star Trek shot natively at 60fps. It would be a feast for the eyes.
 
#23
Odd how for most TVs, game mode disables all this, but the dedicated cinema modes keep them on by default. Like if you want to keep it the default on the standard setting, fine, whatever. But at least have a baseline for the cinema presets.
 
#25
RESIST!

Funny story. A co-worker bought a new TV and came back after the weekend and said new TVs are terrible, they make everything look weird. I was like what? He said the video seems wrong. Then I told him about motion smoothing crap, he turned it off and said I saved him from regretting getting a new TV.
 
#29
The worst part was in the early years of HDTV when trying and failing to explain the problem to other people without having an accepted term for it. So many of them seem to lack the ability to tell the difference, which is mind-boggling to me.
 
#34
Yeah, it's pretty bad. Makes you feel removed from the film, to me. Like you're paying more attention to the smoothness than anything else.

Great for talkshows and sports, though.
 
#35
All those directors should tag Peter Jackson in on the Tweets and ask him why he turned it on for The Hobbit movies

lol

Seriously my friend has this permanently on her TV. I caught Die Hard on it once and it looked like absolute trash.
 

Stinkles

Clothed, sober, cooperative
#37
Here’s a fun trick: with motion smoothing on, watch the uhd version of Lawrence of Arabia to see how cheap and nasty David Lean’s masterpiece looks.
 
#38
The fact that it’s hidden deep in menus and called something different on every TV AND is on by default is the biggest bullshit. Yeah I’m totally gonna drop a few thousand on a TV because I want to make everything look like it was filmed in some British dude’s basement in 1973.
 
#43
I'm not a fan of it, but it does look nice for S3D CG animated content, IMO.
And some sports are broadcast at 60fps anyway. I know baseball is slowly coming into the fold on this.
In the US, anyway, sports programming is virtually always captured and broadcast at 60fps since the '70s.
 
#48
If when purchasing a new TV you don't go through every menu/setting tuning it then what are you even doing with your life?
 

Crossing Eden

Hello, my name is Yves Guillemot, Vivendi S.A.'s Employee of the Month!
#49
THANK YOU! Seriously the motion interpolation makes animated films and films in general look awful.
 
#50
If when purchasing a new TV you don't go through every menu/setting tuning it then what are you even doing with your life?
Most people don't. You'd be surprised. Most family or friends I visit have this shit turned on.

Super enhanced cinema (super monty python diarrhea effect) sounds too good to be turned off for a 500$ TV or something. TV manufacturers are at fault.