Hollywood Directors team up against the scourge of TV Motion Smoothing

Should TV manufacturers make a filter that adds chromatic aberration to your TV?


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LucasArts was working on that tech a long time ago
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swI8fb4V2c4
Video is a re-upload, the demo is from 2010.
VR is using similar techniques to achieve higher framerates with things like Asynchronous Spacewarp.
It's not typically used in non-VR games due to the artifacts that it produces, but I expect that will change as these techniques are improved, and as displays which accept higher refresh rates are more widespread. Most TVs are still limited to 60Hz inputs - though that is hopefully going to change starting next year.

Seeing that movie at 120 FPS in a theater was weird.
I don't care if directors are trying to make it "the future" it looked so real it looked fake.
It only looks that way because you're used to going to the theater and having films look a certain way.
Once you spend enough time with it, you will adapt and find 24 FPS movies difficult to watch without interpolation.

If it ain't broke...
24 FPS is very broken on current displays. Motion doesn't look like it was supposed to, and yet cinephiles claim that it's how things were intended to be seen.

Can't the higher end tvs let you configure it so that you don't get the soap opera but still get the benefits?
Not really. The "soap opera effect" is the smoothness of converting it to a high framerate.
Anything you do to lessen that means it's not going to be as effective.

My Sony TV has "Standard" and "Smooth" Motionflow options along with several other modes.
Standard interpolates to half the framerate of Smooth so there's less "soap opera effect", but also more motion blur and more judder. Panning shots are smoother than 24p but not completely fluid like the Smooth mode.

"Soap Opera Effect" is just a term for smooth motion. I've seen a lot of people on AV sites which complain about the "soap opera effect" from natively high framerate video sources too. They're luddites who like the awful juddering motion of 24p on a flicker-free 120Hz flat panel.

Every time I goto someone's house I always try to fix their TV and everyone gets mad. I get invited somewhere and we turn the TV on and I see something this: https://lcdtvbuyingguide.com/lcdtvpics/reviews/sharp-46d92.jpg
Saturation and brightness all the way up and motion smoothing.
I care a lot about having an accurately calibrated picture, and have been buying calibration hardware since before it started to become affordable. I'll still use the highest amount of motion smoothing possible though.
People aren't going to like it if you go round to their place and complain or start changing picture settings without asking. It's not how things are supposed to look, but some people like having everything be really bright and vibrant, more than they care about being accurate to the source. It's not your TV, and it won't kill you to watch it like that for a couple of hours.
Some displays actually do a good job of making things more vibrant while not ruining skintones and making people look like they're sunburnt. (that display pictured is not one of them)

I'm gonna chalk it up to having the same TV for.... I think going on 6 years? Can someone tell me what TV Motion Smoothing is
I posted two video examples earlier. Here they are again:
Assorted clips from 3 films. (Leon, something else, and Gladiator)
Deadpool title sequence
Make sure you're watching them at 60 FPS.

Yeah, it makes the animation in Rick & Morty look utterly surreal, especially the mouth movements.
Animation is often done at far lower rates than even 24 FPS, it benefits greatly from motion interpolation/smoothing. Panning shots are particularly bad.
Here's a short comparison: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ku9l0I-lcY
 
How about the fact that there is really only one streaming box out there, the Shield TV, that can actually output at 24hz? The Apple TV, the Fire TV, the Roku, the Chromcast, the PS4, the XB1... all total pieces of shit when it comes to streaming anything at the proper frame rate. I’ve got a tv that supports 24hz/72hz and the only thing I can send is a straight Blu-ray through most players or mkv’s through a 2007 WDTV. None of those other devices run apps that support 24hz.

I’m not totally anal about this stuff but native 24hz playback is refreshingly superior to 3/2 pulldown at 60hz, especially during any kind of pan or sweeping shot. You lose all of the choppiness people associate with 24hz playback, because it’s not what they’re actually looking at.
 
Personally i love the feature. Got a $3000 TV for $500 because the seller said the picture looked weird. Checked it out, had to stifle a laugh, quickly paid the guy and left with a new TV. Two minutes in the menu and I felt like dick, but the TV is awesome

Also, I really want 48/60fps films. This nostalgia/comfort/Whatever that keeps us stuck with 24fps for absolutely no reason baffles me. This is 2017 and expensive film stock is no longer a thing. Interpolation does suck, though
 
People who stan for low framerates are the scourge of the entertainment industry and should be denied access to all technological advances that have been made since 24 fps first became standard.
 

ahoyhoy

Unconfirmed Member
All those directors should tag Peter Jackson in on the Tweets and ask him why he turned it on for The Hobbit movies

lol

Seriously my friend has this permanently on her TV. I caught Die Hard on it once and it looked like absolute trash.
They probably already feel bad for Jackson for being rushed through production of those abortions.
 
It would look like garbage and it can fuck off. HFR does not do anything but make film look like low budget crap. 60fps is for videogames, not movies.

You HFR people will never win this fight, thankfully. Nobody can afford to triple their CG budgets.
Only because people have been trained to associate 24fps with high budget blockbusters.

If 50fps was the chosen standard, anything at 24fps would look jerky and antiquated. A lot like how 12fps early silent film looks awkward today.
 

Stinkles

Clothed, sober, cooperative
Personally i love the feature. Got a $3000 TV for $500 because the seller said the picture looked weird. Checked it out, had to stifle a laugh, quickly paid the guy and left with a new TV. Two minutes in the menu and I felt like dick, but the TV is awesome

Also, I really want 48/60fps films. This nostalgia/comfort/Whatever that keeps us stuck with 24fps for absolutely no reason baffles me. This is 2017 and expensive film stock is no longer a thing. Interpolation does suck, though
And people said I was evil
 
Yep I turn it off. There are a few things I like it on though, sports as it makes ball tracking a lot easier and more like viewing the event live, concerts and nature documentaries for the same latter reason. Lastly video games if they could get rid or lower the lag from the processing greatly
 
Why do the troll polls lately have only tragic options instead of funny ones? Pretty soon the polls will ask if you'd prefer the USA to be run over by the neo-nazi or the KKK,
 
I hate this feature.

Everything looks like bad 80ies VHS home videos with this on.

Crazy thing is, a lot of people don't even notice the difference..
yeah, when my family got a new tv and I didnt know the name for this at the time. I was the only one that noticed and said something and everyone looked at me like I was crazy.
 

Brandon F

Well congratulations! You got yourself caught!
They have my swor...remote.

Always the most awkward moment visiting someone else's home and having that internal debate on whether to speak up about the terrible feature they probably are unaware of. I mean I know it probably sounds like the most prickish thing to even mention, especially when they are showing off their hot new TV.